40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost:

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost:

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost:

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost:

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost: 

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER 

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost:

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

active shooter

How to Prepare for an Active Shooter Incident

The FBI website states there have been 250 active shooter incidents in the United States from 2000 to 2017 with 2,217 casualties.

While you may feel this couldn’t happen at your workplace, you may be wrong. The data also shows that 42 percent of these incidents took place in a business setting.

In our recent blog post Complete Your Safety Manual by Including an Active Shooter Program, we discussed how active shooters are difficult to profile because it’s usually an irrational, random target. Profilers share that active shooters tend to focus on “soft targets”, which includes crowded open spaces and a lack of security. This makes construction sites, lumber yards, and the likes a bit more of a potential target. We also stressed the importance of putting employee assistance programs in place in the event of an active shooter event.

Though there are steps to include to help alleviate the physical and mental pain if this type of event ever occurs, the real question is what your business can do to prepare for an active shooter event.

According to the American Society of Safety Professionals, there are five key areas you can focus on to better protect your work site and employees from workplace violence.

1. Assess Your Risks

The first step to protecting your site and employees is understanding your vulnerabilities. Much like a regular workplace risk assessment, an active shooter/armed assailant risk analysis is an invaluable tool in determining what gaps currently exist and how those can be mitigated moving forward.

2. Safeguard Your Facility

Assessing your risks and vulnerabilities provides a better understanding of what it will take to make your facility more secure.

3. Train Your Staff

To ensure that a plan is deployed effectively, everyone needs to understand their roles and responsibilities. Conducting training exercises helps employees think about what they would need to do in an active shooter/armed assailant situation and familiarizes them with the procedures in place to help protect their safety. 

4. Coordinate With Responding Agencies

Invite local police, fire departments and first responders to your site can help you build relationships with those agencies and help them become familiar with your facility.

5. Handle Post-Incident Issues

Ensure your employees get the attention they need, including any counseling to help them cope with what they’ve experienced.

Need to train your staff? Check out our upcoming Events

ahsan-s-1295033-unsplash

Developing an Effective Health and Safety Program: Step 4: Accountability

Accountability ensures that your workplace health and safety program is implemented as intended. If no one is held accountable for their participation in the program, safety won’t be treated as a legitimate business objective (as efficiency and profitability are). If your health and safety program has goals, they need to be set as real expectations that are visible to the entire organization. Here are some tips for keeping up accountability for your workplace health and safety program.

  1. Create a Team: For sizable organizations, it can be quite difficult to hold all employees accountable for the effective implementation of your program. You should talk to employees and see who is interested in improving health and safety conditions at your workplace. Assemble a team that will be responsible for implementing and monitoring the program. Assign individuals with specific tasks and hold them accountable for making sure they get done.
  2. Set Expectations: Don’t be vague about the goals of your health and safety program. Set realistic, measurable expectations and check in on progress regularly. For example, if one of your program goals is to reduce workplace injuries, set a realistic percentage that you want to see reduced from the current injury rate.
  3. Create a Timeline: Create a timeline for when you expect measurable goals to be accomplished and check in with your health and safety program team regularly to ensure that the organization is on track.
  4. Make Goals Visible: If health and safety objectives aren’t visible to the entire company, it’s hard to hold anyone accountable for them. Make sure that everyone is expected by not only management but also by their coworkers to play their role in carrying out the program.
  5. Reward Performance: Publicly reward employees who make significant contributions to the health and safety program to encourage others to help out.

Use these tips to increase health and safety accountability in your workplace and ensure that your program is implemented as effectively as possible. Contact United Alliance Services for information on creating a health and safety program, employee training sessions, and more. We offer a wide range of services that focus on improving health and safety in a variety of industries.

 

Read the previous Steps:

Step 1: Developing an Effective Health and Safety Program: Step 1: Leadership

Step: Developing an Effective Health and Safety Program: Step 2: Communication and Awareness

Step 3: Developing an Effective Health and Safety Program: Step 3: Tracking Trends & Effectiveness

 

Worker using fall protection gear as a safety precaution he learned in em 385 training

Does your company have a culture that elevates safety to a world-class level?

If so, then you should apply to be one of America’s Safest Companies.

EHSToday.com recently announced that the application process for selection as the 2019 America’s Safest Companies, an honor bestowed on more than 200 companies since 2002, has begun. The application process is open from May 1 through July 15, 2019

According to their website:

“To be considered one of America’s Safest Companies, organizations must demonstrate: support from leadership and management for EHS efforts; employee involvement in the EHS process; innovative solutions to safety challenges; injury and illness rates lower than the average for their industries; comprehensive training programs; evidence that prevention of incidents is the cornerstone of the safety process; good communication about the value of safety; and a way to substantiate the benefits of the safety process.”

Winners will be expected to attend the America’s Safest Companies Awards Night Out, held Nov. 6, 2019 at the Safety Leadership Conference in Dallas.

If you’re interested in applying – we can help.

We provide OSHA and workplace environmental health and safety consulting services for businesses and industries throughout the New England region.

Our senior consultants and instructional staff are qualified and experienced in creating occupational safety and health management solutions, specifically tailored to the needs of private and public sector workforces.

Contact us today to learn how we can assist you with the application process.

8-steps-to-an-effective-workplace-health-and-safety-program-1-opt

8 Steps to an Effective Workplace Health and Safety Program

An effective health and safety program has several key objectives: to prevent injuries and illnesses, to improve compliance with laws and regulations, to reduce costs spent on workers’ compensation, and to increase general productivity. Health and safety should be one of the key foundations of your company culture. If you want to create a health and safety program that effectively accomplishes those objectives, follow these 8 steps!

  1. Establish Health and Safety and Company Core Values

When you speak to your employees (whether they be new hires or lifelong employees), make sure to emphasize the importance of health and safety. Health and safety should be company objectives, just like customer service or quality work.

  1. Lead by Example

Always follow your own health and safety protocols. Make sure to explain why you take certain measures to improve safety. If your employees see by your actions that you genuinely value health and safety, they will follow suit.

  1. Implement a Reporting/Suggesting System

Make sure that your employees feel comfortable reporting health/safety infractions and making suggestions on how to improve protocol. Set up a reporting/suggesting system that gives your employees a private way to speak about health/safety concerns. Your workers will likely identify safety risks that you never knew about, but only if you encourage them to.

  1. Provide Training

Safety training sessions are essential to demonstrate your commitment to workplace safety and to make sure employees continue to follow through with the rules. Show employees the protocol for dealing with hazards, reporting injuries/near misses, etc.

  1. Conduct Regular Inspections 

Regular workplace inspections are necessary to identify potential hazards. Don’t do them alone; bring your workers with you for workplace inspections so that they know what to look for. They may identify hazards that you would have missed.

  1. Address Emergencies

Have a protocol set for every foreseeable emergency and follow them strictly when an incident occurs.

  1. Seek Input On Workplace/Procedure Changes

Before making significant changes to the workplace or to regular procedures, consult with your employees; they may identify potential health/safety hazards, which may change your course of action.

  1. Keep Improving 

Set aside a regular, scheduled time to meet with employees to discuss workplace health and safety. Take suggestions, discuss incidents/near misses, and never stop improving your health and safety program.

Learn more about workplace health and safety here: https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/