40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost:

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost:

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost:

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost:

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost: 

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

Defense lawyer with client in court

COVID-19 Related Workplace Lawsuits Are on The Rise

COVID-19 continues to cause a negative impact on the economy. Businesses struggle to remain open and many people are concerned about their health and safety. With many businesses, and now schools, reopening or beginning to reopen, people face a challenging choice between income and safety.

The search for an effective vaccine is underway, and the results seem promising. People still need to remain vigilant in protecting themselves and others from potentially spreading the virus.

Though a safe work environment is a key to the success of the economy and to people’s health, it appears some companies are not following proper guidelines. This has led to an uptick in workplace lawsuits.

Workplace Lawsuits on The Rise

Fisher and Phillips, a law firm representing employers in labor and employment matters, offers an interactive COVID-19 Employment Litigation Tracker which shows there are more than 670 pending complaints.

In MA alone, there were over 900 COVID relates complaints. Many of the complaints were due to failure to allow for enough social distancing and a lack of cleaning and disinfection. While other complaints were for employers allegedly requiring those with COVID-19 symptoms to come into work.

Recently, Harrah’s, MGM Grand and Bellagio casinos were sued by a group of employees for not informing them when co-workers tested positive and did not provide adequate contact-trace before allowing colleagues of infected employees to return to the job.

The top coronavirus-related workplace issues that may lead to litigation seem to revolve around:

  • Paid sick leave or paid family leave wasn’t paid as mandated under the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act
  • Whistleblower claims. Many states have laws designed to protect people who report information about suspected illegal, wasteful, or unethical activity.
  • Safety concerns and wage and hour issues that don’t meet the OSHA General Duty Clause
  • Wrongful death

Clearly lawsuits are on the rise. This will be an ongoing issue many businesses will need to learn to mitigate.

How Can Employers Protect Themselves?

If you have concerns or are being sued, your first step should be to consult with your attorney.

Make sure you have a plan in place to resolve any COVID health issues that may arise. The CDC provides guidance on how to maintain healthy business operations:

Here are some steps to consider:

  • Identify a workplace coordinator who will be responsible for COVID-19 issues
  • Implement flexible sick leave and supportive policies and practices
  • Protect employees at higher risk for severe illness through supportive policies and practices.
  • Communicate supportive workplace policies clearly, frequently, and via multiple methods.
  • Assess your essential functions and the reliance that others and the community have on your services or products.
  • Determine how you will operate if absenteeism spikes
  • Establish policies and practices for social distancing.
  • Document any wage changes due to reduced hours, furloughs, or layoffs
  • Comply with employee confidentiality when/if providing temperature screening or other health tests

We’re Here to Help

There is still much we do not know about this virus. Implementing a plan now can provide a safer work environment and possibly help reduce the chance of a business lawsuit.

In these challenging times, the risk of exposure is more prevalent than ever. We offer two Safety Service Options:

COVID-19 CONSULTING BUNDLE – Written directive/policy on requirements which can be either a corporate policy or a site-specific policy.

COVID-19 TRAINING (INFECTION CONTROL WEBINAR) – We offer Open Enrollment Classes and Private Company Sponsored Classes made available at your convenience.

COVID19 TESTING – We now offer COVID-19 Testing Services For Colleges, Universities, Private Companies, And Public Agencies

If you have concerns about your workforce and coronavirus, please contact us today to learn about steps you can take to protect yourself, your family, and your employees.

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER 

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost:

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

active shooter

How to Prepare for an Active Shooter Incident

The FBI website states there have been 250 active shooter incidents in the United States from 2000 to 2017 with 2,217 casualties.

While you may feel this couldn’t happen at your workplace, you may be wrong. The data also shows that 42 percent of these incidents took place in a business setting.

In our recent blog post Complete Your Safety Manual by Including an Active Shooter Program, we discussed how active shooters are difficult to profile because it’s usually an irrational, random target. Profilers share that active shooters tend to focus on “soft targets”, which includes crowded open spaces and a lack of security. This makes construction sites, lumber yards, and the likes a bit more of a potential target. We also stressed the importance of putting employee assistance programs in place in the event of an active shooter event.

Though there are steps to include to help alleviate the physical and mental pain if this type of event ever occurs, the real question is what your business can do to prepare for an active shooter event.

According to the American Society of Safety Professionals, there are five key areas you can focus on to better protect your work site and employees from workplace violence.

1. Assess Your Risks

The first step to protecting your site and employees is understanding your vulnerabilities. Much like a regular workplace risk assessment, an active shooter/armed assailant risk analysis is an invaluable tool in determining what gaps currently exist and how those can be mitigated moving forward.

2. Safeguard Your Facility

Assessing your risks and vulnerabilities provides a better understanding of what it will take to make your facility more secure.

3. Train Your Staff

To ensure that a plan is deployed effectively, everyone needs to understand their roles and responsibilities. Conducting training exercises helps employees think about what they would need to do in an active shooter/armed assailant situation and familiarizes them with the procedures in place to help protect their safety. 

4. Coordinate With Responding Agencies

Invite local police, fire departments and first responders to your site can help you build relationships with those agencies and help them become familiar with your facility.

5. Handle Post-Incident Issues

Ensure your employees get the attention they need, including any counseling to help them cope with what they’ve experienced.

Need to train your staff? Check out our upcoming Events

scott-blake-1143099-unsplash

Developing an Effective Health and Safety Program Step 5: Immediate Corrective Action

When it comes to health and safety in the workplace, it’s essential to deal with hazards as quickly as possible. When an incident or near miss occurs, or when a hazard is identified by a worker, it is the responsibility of both management and your safety program’s leaders to take immediate action. Immediate corrective action not only prevent further injury or illness from occurring, it also shows your workers that your organization takes safety seriously.

These are three steps that can help you to take the most effective action when an incident occurs at your worksite.  

  1. React: If a worker is injured, the first step is to ensure that they receive proper medical attention as soon as possible.
  2. Investigate: Investigation isn’t about placing blame; it’s about identifying the root causes of the injury and making sure that workers understand why the incident occurred. Investigations should be conducted by supervisors and employees working together.
  3. Reflect: Create a detailed report of the incident for your records. Then, ask these three questions in your post-incident reflection. If a rule or procedure was not followed, why was it not followed? Did pressures for productivity play a role, and if so, why were they allowed to jeopardize safety? Was the procedure or safety training related to the procedure out-of-date or inadequate?

While immediate corrective action is crucial, it’s also important to let these situations guide long-term corrective action. A quick-fix for a safety hazard is never acceptable. Once immediate action has been taken and the hazard has been eliminated, it’s necessary to consider how the occurrence should impact your overall program in the long-term.

United Alliance Services provides a variety of workplace health and safety training services to companies in the New England area. Contact us today to learn more about how our services can help make your workplace safer.

Read the previous Steps:

Step 1: Developing an Effective Health and Safety Program: Step 1: Leadership

Step: Developing an Effective Health and Safety Program: Step 2: Communication and Awareness

Step 3: Developing an Effective Health and Safety Program: Step 3: Tracking Trends & Effectiveness

Step 4: Developing an Effective Health and Safety Program: Step 4: Accountability

 

Man in a hardhat standing inside a warehouse

Assisting Mass Municipal Agencies in Preparing for the 2019 OSHA Requirements

Updated OSHA Compliance with MGL has begun!

Here is a simple one-pager on how United Alliance Services can help get you into compliance!

OSHA Safety Training for Municipalities & Schools

Beginning February 2019, public employees are required to provide OSHA safety training and maintain OSHA compliance with job sites and safety training.

OSHA – UASC Training for MUNICIPALITIES:

  • Address the OSHA training requirements specific to each department
  • Training standards help municipalities perform jobs safely reducing worker comp, medical leave times, and injuries on the job.
  • Choose up to six electives that best suits your team members.
  • We maintain copies of all training’s, so if your system is compromised, we have a backup.
  • We’ll notify you when refreshers need to be renewed, so it’s one less thing to fall through the cracks.
  • We have developed the training programs allowing you to focus on your area of expertise

Click here for OSHA Safety Training for Municipalities!

OSHA – UASC Training for SCHOOLS:

  • Experienced OSHA safety regulations instructors
  • Help school employees perform their jobs safely by outlining first-hand, real-life scenarios
  • You choose the sessions that best suit your team members as you know them best
  • We maintain backup copies of all training documentation
  • Notifications when refreshers need to be renewed
  • We have developed the training programs, which is our area of expertise, to allow you to focus on your area of expertise – running an efficient school system.

Click here for OSHA Safety Training for MA Schools!

Record Keeping

Prior to the new law, the public sector was exempt from maintaining an OSHA 300 log. The MA Department of Labor Standards (DLS) now states that you only need to provide your OSHA 300 log when an inspector or the Bureau of Labor Statistics requests to see it.

The best practice is to maintain an OSHA 300 log.

OSHA 300 Log for MA Public Sector

An OSHA 300 log is used by private sector employers with more than 10 employees to maintain a record of injuries and illnesses that took place and are referred to as a “recordable”.

All of the recordables are documented, but each record also needs a form 301 completed, which details the injury/illness.

A recordable includes any work-related illness and/or injury that results in:

• Fatality
• loss of consciousness, missed work, restricted work, transfer to a lower-risk job
• medical treatment beyond first aid
• diagnosis of a work-related cancer, chronic irreversible disease, fractured or cracked bones/teeth, and punctured eardrums
• any drugs being prescribed or taken at prescription strength

Needle-sticks and sharps injuries, medical removal, hearing loss, and tuberculosis have special recording criteria.

Man in a hardhat standing inside a warehouse

Assisting Mass Municipal Agencies in Preparing for the 2019 OSHA Requirements

Updated OSHA Compliance with MGL has begun!

Here is a simple one-pager on how United Alliance Services can help get you into compliance!

OSHA Safety Training for Municipalities & Schools

Beginning February 2019, public employees are required to provide OSHA safety training and maintain OSHA compliance with job sites and safety training.

OSHA – UASC Training for MUNICIPALITIES:

  • Address the OSHA training requirements specific to each department
  • Training standards help municipalities perform jobs safely reducing worker comp, medical leave times, and injuries on the job.
  • Choose up to six electives that best suits your team members.
  • We maintain copies of all training’s, so if your system is compromised, we have a backup.
  • We’ll notify you when refreshers need to be renewed, so it’s one less thing to fall through the cracks.
  • We have developed the training programs allowing you to focus on your area of expertise

Click here for OSHA Safety Training for Municipalities!

OSHA – UASC Training for SCHOOLS:

  • Experienced OSHA safety regulations instructors
  • Help school employees perform their jobs safely by outlining first-hand, real-life scenarios
  • You choose the sessions that best suit your team members as you know them best
  • We maintain backup copies of all training documentation
  • Notifications when refreshers need to be renewed
  • We have developed the training programs, which is our area of expertise, to allow you to focus on your area of expertise – running an efficient school system.

Click here for OSHA Safety Training for MA Schools!

Record Keeping

Prior to the new law, the public sector was exempt from maintaining an OSHA 300 log. The MA Department of Labor Standards (DLS) now states that you only need to provide your OSHA 300 log when an inspector or the Bureau of Labor Statistics requests to see it.

The best practice is to maintain an OSHA 300 log.

OSHA 300 Log for MA Public Sector

An OSHA 300 log is used by private sector employers with more than 10 employees to maintain a record of injuries and illnesses that took place and are referred to as a “recordable”.

All of the recordables are documented, but each record also needs a form 301 completed, which details the injury/illness.

A recordable includes any work-related illness and/or injury that results in:

• Fatality
• loss of consciousness, missed work, restricted work, transfer to a lower-risk job
• medical treatment beyond first aid
• diagnosis of a work-related cancer, chronic irreversible disease, fractured or cracked bones/teeth, and punctured eardrums
• any drugs being prescribed or taken at prescription strength

Needle-sticks and sharps injuries, medical removal, hearing loss, and tuberculosis have special recording criteria.

Man in a hardhat standing inside a warehouse

UASC @ The MMA Annual Meeting & Trade Show

To conclude our series of blogs, we are excited to announce our attendance to The MMA Annual Meeting & Trade Show 1/18/19 – 1/19/19!

Blog #1
Blog #2
Blog #3

Updated MGL with OSHA compliance

In correspondence to the updated MGL Chapter 149, section 6 1/2 we are here to answer any questions.

On March 9, 2018, Massachusetts rolled out an updated MGL Chapter 149, section 6 1/2 to include reference to OSHA regulations, updating the law written before OSHA’s inception. It has left public sector employers scrambling to figure out exactly how they are affected and how to quickly get into compliance within the short time frame provided. The updated law helps clarify the responsibilities of public sector employers, which is enforced by the Massachusetts Department of Labor Standards (DLS), while giving everyone less than a year to become in compliance.

The MMA Annual Meeting & Trade Show

This the largest regular gathering of Massachusetts local government officials. This show features educational workshops, nationally recognized speakers, awards programs, a large trade show, and an opportunity to network with municipal officials from across the state.

Shortly after this, the new Massachusetts Department of Labor Standards’ safety training mandates on the public sector will be enforceable and United Alliance Services Corporation is ready to connect with you. We have already secured our booth at the tradeshow to answer questions you may have about the new mandate and how your department will be affected. Our consultants have decades of experience with OSHA safety standards and can easily apply them to various departments to ensure the best training is delivered.

Our safety consultants and training department have weeded through the requirements and have pulled together a blog series to shed some light on the changes, help you determine the training you need, and bring your department into compliance.

We have created custom packages for municipalities and schools that are budget-friendly, easy to deliver, and satisfies the requirements:

OSHA Safety Training for MA Schools

OSHA Safety Training for Municipalities

Please stop by our booth #712 to learn more!