24-Hour HAZWOPER Training Course (3 Days)

OSHA 29CFR 1910.120, the Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) standard states that 24-hours of HAZWOPER training is the minimum requirement for those employees whose job does not require them to handle waste or hazardous materials as part of their job. However, if they are required to respond to such incidents as uncontrolled releases or the potential of uncontrolled releases, they must respond as first responders to control and possibly perform cleanup operations. This 24-hour class is not designed to be as in-depth as the 40-hour HAZWOPER course.

Topics:
Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend:
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements:
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8AM to 5PM each day

24-Hour HAZWOPER Training Course (3 Days)

OSHA 29CFR 1910.120, the Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) standard states that 24-hours of HAZWOPER training is the minimum requirement for those employees whose job does not require them to handle waste or hazardous materials as part of their job. However, if they are required to respond to such incidents as uncontrolled releases or the potential of uncontrolled releases, they must respond as first responders to control and possibly perform cleanup operations. This 24-hour class is not designed to be as in-depth as the 40-hour HAZWOPER course.

Topics:
Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend:
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements:
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8AM to 5PM each day

24-Hour HAZWOPER Training Course (3 Days)

OSHA 29CFR 1910.120, the Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) standard states that 24-hours of HAZWOPER training is the minimum requirement for those employees whose job does not require them to handle waste or hazardous materials as part of their job. However, if they are required to respond to such incidents as uncontrolled releases or the potential of uncontrolled releases, they must respond as first responders to control and possibly perform cleanup operations. This 24-hour class is not designed to be as in-depth as the 40-hour HAZWOPER course.

Topics:
Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend:
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements:
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00AM to 5:00PM each day

24-Hour HAZWOPER Training Course (3 Days)

OSHA 29CFR 1910.120, the Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) standard states that 24-hours of HAZWOPER training is the minimum requirement for those employees whose job does not require them to handle waste or hazardous materials as part of their job. However, if they are required to respond to such incidents as uncontrolled releases or the potential of uncontrolled releases, they must respond as first responders to control and possibly perform cleanup operations. This 24-hour class is not designed to be as in-depth as the 40-hour HAZWOPER course.

Topics:
Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend:
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements:
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00AM to 5:00PM each day

Worker using fall protection gear as a safety precaution he learned in em 385 training

UASC filling in EM385 FP Training lack in Northeast

It’s a training requirement that has hit many construction supervisor or project manager’s site; yet, it still seems to be one of those trainings that is not widely offered, even here in the Northeast. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has a 900-page manual that outlines the safety regulations for their job-sites, with many of the requirements being a bit stricter than OSHA regulations. Every contractor and subcontractor on a UASCE-overseen job-site must have at least one person who is trained and competent on the specifics buried within those 900 pages of their Engineer Manual (EM) 385-1-1. There’s no getting out of it.

PM’s Need for EM 385 Training

Given the amount of daily phone calls we receive from PMs who need the training ASAP in order to return to work, the UASCE has become more stringent on ensuring this training is completed. They are also doling out some hefty fines as well as issuing stop orders until the mandates are met – especially if you don’t have designated safety personnel on-site. Thankfully, we have several highly competent and trained construction professionals who have poured over the complete 900 pages and have designed a training program that ensures compliance. Our EM 385 Compliance training, often referred to as 24 Hour Competent Person Fall Protection, is one of our most sought out trainings – often after being kicked off a job site. Those same trainers are able to also assist on meeting the requirements of having a Site Safety and Health Officer (SSHO) and Quality Control Manager, Quality Assurances Manager (QA/QC) on-site quickly.

Federal Bid Requirement

If you’re planning on bidding on a federal contract that takes place in Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York and New Jersey or on any of the bases listed below, be sure to reach out to us to secure your training. This will no doubt save your company money, fines, and lost work-time and make you the star employee of the week. We can promise you that somewhere, tucked away in the fine print, the USACE requires you to have at least one person training in EM 385, 24 Hour Competent Person Fall Protection on your site at ALL times. There aren’t any loopholes or fast-talking yourself out of the requirement. It also doesn’t exempt you from following OSHA regulations and our course clearly outlines the differences between the two. Because of this, we strongly recommend that all persons in our EM 385 training also have completed their OSHA 10 Hour Construction training. For an added peace of mind, we strongly recommend you train multiple employees to ensure that you always have someone available in case of injury, illness, or time off requests.

We’ve clocked thousands of hours of training on this topic at various bases and our experts can help your team members understand the complexities of the UASCE requirements, ensure their fall arrest systems are safe and in compliance, and know their responsibilities on a job site.

Projects on Bases

If you have any upcoming projects in VT, NH, MA, RI, CT, NY or NJ at any of these bases*, be sure to call us today to secure your training dates or SSHO and/or QA/QC needs:

Massachusetts

Barnes Air National Guard Base, Westfield, MA
Otis Air National Guard Base, Buzzards Bay, MA
Hanscom Airforce Base, Bedford, MA
Westover Air Reserve Base, Chicopee, MA
Fort Devens, Devens, MA
AIRSTA Cape Cod, Buzzards Bay, MA
AIRSTA Salem, Salem, MA
Aviation Station Ten Pound Island, Gloucester, MA

Rhode Island

Quonset Point Air National Guard Station, North Kingstown, RI
NS Newport, Newport RI

Connecticut

Marine Safety Center Marine Base in Groton, CT
Research And Development Center Coast Guard Groton, CT
Coast Guard Academy in New London, CT
Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, CT

New York

Fort Drum Army Base in Jefferson, NY
Fort Hamilton Army Base in Brooklyn, NY
US Military Academy Army Base in West Point, NY
Watervilet Arsenal Army Base in Watervilet, NY

New Jersey

McGuire Air Force Base in New Hanover, NJ
Fort Dix Army Base in Burlington, NJ
Fort Monmouth Army Base in Monmouth, NJ
Picatinny Arsenal Army Base in Morris County, NJ
Loran Support Unit Coast Guard Base in Wildwood, NJ
Training Center Cape May Coast Guard Cape May, NJ
NWS Earle Navy Base in Colts Neck, NJ
NAES Lakehurst Navy Base in Lakehurst, NJ

*This is not a complete list of military bases

To sign up for an EM385 24 Hour Fall Protection Training Class, visit our website. To sign up for the next public class offering at United Alliance Services Corporation, visit our online calendar. For more information, call 774-302-4305.

Man in a hardhat standing inside a warehouse

Assisting Mass Municipal Agencies in Preparing for the 2019 OSHA Requirements

Updated OSHA Compliance with MGL has begun!

Here is a simple one-pager on how United Alliance Services can help get you into compliance!

OSHA Safety Training for Municipalities & Schools

Beginning February 2019, public employees are required to provide OSHA safety training and maintain OSHA compliance with job sites and safety training.

OSHA – UASC Training for MUNICIPALITIES:

  • Address the OSHA training requirements specific to each department
  • Training standards help municipalities perform jobs safely reducing worker comp, medical leave times, and injuries on the job.
  • Choose up to six electives that best suits your team members.
  • We maintain copies of all training’s, so if your system is compromised, we have a backup.
  • We’ll notify you when refreshers need to be renewed, so it’s one less thing to fall through the cracks.
  • We have developed the training programs allowing you to focus on your area of expertise

Click here for OSHA Safety Training for Municipalities!

OSHA – UASC Training for SCHOOLS:

  • Experienced OSHA safety regulations instructors
  • Help school employees perform their jobs safely by outlining first-hand, real-life scenarios
  • You choose the sessions that best suit your team members as you know them best
  • We maintain backup copies of all training documentation
  • Notifications when refreshers need to be renewed
  • We have developed the training programs, which is our area of expertise, to allow you to focus on your area of expertise – running an efficient school system.

Click here for OSHA Safety Training for MA Schools!

Record Keeping

Prior to the new law, the public sector was exempt from maintaining an OSHA 300 log. The MA Department of Labor Standards (DLS) now states that you only need to provide your OSHA 300 log when an inspector or the Bureau of Labor Statistics requests to see it.

The best practice is to maintain an OSHA 300 log.

OSHA 300 Log for MA Public Sector

An OSHA 300 log is used by private sector employers with more than 10 employees to maintain a record of injuries and illnesses that took place and are referred to as a “recordable”.

All of the recordables are documented, but each record also needs a form 301 completed, which details the injury/illness.

A recordable includes any work-related illness and/or injury that results in:

• Fatality
• loss of consciousness, missed work, restricted work, transfer to a lower-risk job
• medical treatment beyond first aid
• diagnosis of a work-related cancer, chronic irreversible disease, fractured or cracked bones/teeth, and punctured eardrums
• any drugs being prescribed or taken at prescription strength

Needle-sticks and sharps injuries, medical removal, hearing loss, and tuberculosis have special recording criteria.

Sponsors

UASC & ABC MA 2019 Kick-Off & Induction

United Alliance Services Corporation is a General Sponsor!

Happening now, UASC is attending the 2019 Kickoff Meeting and Installation of Officers

We became a general sponsor this year and are looking forward to what 2019 has to offer both ABC MA & UASC

  • Experts on assisting with ABC STEP PROGRAM (Safety Training and Evaluation Process)
  • Engaged on safety programs with Gould Construction Institute.

We are also connected to the ABC RI Chapter

Don Royer is Co-chair on safety and education for ABC RI

8-steps-to-an-effective-workplace-health-and-safety-program-1-opt

8 Steps to an Effective Workplace Health and Safety Program

An effective health and safety program has several key objectives: to prevent injuries and illnesses, to improve compliance with laws and regulations, to reduce costs spent on workers’ compensation, and to increase general productivity. Health and safety should be one of the key foundations of your company culture. If you want to create a health and safety program that effectively accomplishes those objectives, follow these 8 steps!

  1. Establish Health and Safety and Company Core Values

When you speak to your employees (whether they be new hires or lifelong employees), make sure to emphasize the importance of health and safety. Health and safety should be company objectives, just like customer service or quality work.

  1. Lead by Example

Always follow your own health and safety protocols. Make sure to explain why you take certain measures to improve safety. If your employees see by your actions that you genuinely value health and safety, they will follow suit.

  1. Implement a Reporting/Suggesting System

Make sure that your employees feel comfortable reporting health/safety infractions and making suggestions on how to improve protocol. Set up a reporting/suggesting system that gives your employees a private way to speak about health/safety concerns. Your workers will likely identify safety risks that you never knew about, but only if you encourage them to.

  1. Provide Training

Safety training sessions are essential to demonstrate your commitment to workplace safety and to make sure employees continue to follow through with the rules. Show employees the protocol for dealing with hazards, reporting injuries/near misses, etc.

  1. Conduct Regular Inspections 

Regular workplace inspections are necessary to identify potential hazards. Don’t do them alone; bring your workers with you for workplace inspections so that they know what to look for. They may identify hazards that you would have missed.

  1. Address Emergencies

Have a protocol set for every foreseeable emergency and follow them strictly when an incident occurs.

  1. Seek Input On Workplace/Procedure Changes

Before making significant changes to the workplace or to regular procedures, consult with your employees; they may identify potential health/safety hazards, which may change your course of action.

  1. Keep Improving 

Set aside a regular, scheduled time to meet with employees to discuss workplace health and safety. Take suggestions, discuss incidents/near misses, and never stop improving your health and safety program.

Learn more about workplace health and safety here: https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/

Walking Working Surfaces Awareness Course

This course covers the OSHA Walking-Working Surfaces standards for General Industry. This includes information on general safety requirements, protection from holes in the floor and walls, ladder safety, and scaffold safety. Participants learn how to apply the OSHA regulations for walking and working surfaces to avoid slips, trips, and falls in the workplace and how to recognize safe work practices for installing, maintaining, and using stairs, ladders, and scaffolds.

Course Topics:
OSHA Walking – Working Surfaces Regulation (29 CFR 1910.21-30, Subpart D)
Key terminology and concepts
Letters of interpretation that show how OSHA responds to implementation questions
The consequences of poor housekeeping
The difference between standard rail guards and handrails
Hazards of wall and floor holes
Specifications for safe design and construction of fixed general industry stairs
Minimum requirements for dockboards
Proper care and use of portable ladders
General scaffolding requirements

Who Should Attend:
All general industry worker and supervisors

Regulatory Requirements:
29 CFR 1910.21-30, Subpart D

Man in a hardhat standing inside a warehouse

Assisting Mass Municipal Agencies in Preparing for the 2019 OSHA Requirements

Updated OSHA Compliance with MGL has begun!

Here is a simple one-pager on how United Alliance Services can help get you into compliance!

OSHA Safety Training for Municipalities & Schools

Beginning February 2019, public employees are required to provide OSHA safety training and maintain OSHA compliance with job sites and safety training.

OSHA – UASC Training for MUNICIPALITIES:

  • Address the OSHA training requirements specific to each department
  • Training standards help municipalities perform jobs safely reducing worker comp, medical leave times, and injuries on the job.
  • Choose up to six electives that best suits your team members.
  • We maintain copies of all training’s, so if your system is compromised, we have a backup.
  • We’ll notify you when refreshers need to be renewed, so it’s one less thing to fall through the cracks.
  • We have developed the training programs allowing you to focus on your area of expertise

Click here for OSHA Safety Training for Municipalities!

OSHA – UASC Training for SCHOOLS:

  • Experienced OSHA safety regulations instructors
  • Help school employees perform their jobs safely by outlining first-hand, real-life scenarios
  • You choose the sessions that best suit your team members as you know them best
  • We maintain backup copies of all training documentation
  • Notifications when refreshers need to be renewed
  • We have developed the training programs, which is our area of expertise, to allow you to focus on your area of expertise – running an efficient school system.

Click here for OSHA Safety Training for MA Schools!

Record Keeping

Prior to the new law, the public sector was exempt from maintaining an OSHA 300 log. The MA Department of Labor Standards (DLS) now states that you only need to provide your OSHA 300 log when an inspector or the Bureau of Labor Statistics requests to see it.

The best practice is to maintain an OSHA 300 log.

OSHA 300 Log for MA Public Sector

An OSHA 300 log is used by private sector employers with more than 10 employees to maintain a record of injuries and illnesses that took place and are referred to as a “recordable”.

All of the recordables are documented, but each record also needs a form 301 completed, which details the injury/illness.

A recordable includes any work-related illness and/or injury that results in:

• Fatality
• loss of consciousness, missed work, restricted work, transfer to a lower-risk job
• medical treatment beyond first aid
• diagnosis of a work-related cancer, chronic irreversible disease, fractured or cracked bones/teeth, and punctured eardrums
• any drugs being prescribed or taken at prescription strength

Needle-sticks and sharps injuries, medical removal, hearing loss, and tuberculosis have special recording criteria.

OSHA 10-Hour Maritime Industry (2 Days)

The 10-hour Maritime Outreach Course for Shipyard Employment is intended to provide entry-level safety and health hazard information tailored to shipyard employees involved in ship repairing, shipbuilding, and ship breaking. This entry level course focuses on identification, avoidance, control, and prevention – not OSHA standards. This course is taught by an OSHA-authorized instructor. Participants who successfully complete the course will receive a card from OSHA verifying their completion of the course.

Topics:

  • Introduction to OSHA
  • Walking and working surfaces
  • Fall protection/Scaffolding
  • Confined and enclosed spaces
  • Hazardous materials
  • Personal protective equipment
  • Fire protection
  • Electrical Lockout/tagout
  • Machine guarding
  • Hot work
  • Hazard Communication
  • Machine Guarding

Who Should Attend: All individuals who work on maritime sites

Regulatory Requirements: 29CFR 1915

Class Hours:

  • Day 1:  8:00 am – 4:30 pm
  • Day 2:  8:00 am – 10:45 am

Respiratory Protection Awareness

Workers who are exposed to dust and other contaminants are at risk of developing respiratory related diseases. This course will provide information that will enable employees to understand and prevent the hazards associated with dust, fumes, mists, and oxygen deficient and enriched atmospheres.

Students will learn the types, proper selection, limitations, intended use, inspection, cleaning and storage of respirators. Participants will also learn about the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Attendees will be presented with the elements to create a required OSHA respiratory plan. Note: Students will not wear a respirator in this class.

Topics:

  • OSHA Standard 29CFR 1910.134
  • Respiratory Protection
  • The requirements needed to develop a written respiratory plan
  • Respiratory hazards in the workplace Types of respirators and cartridges
  • Anatomy /physiology of the respiratory system
  • Proper methods of inspecting, cleaning, and storage of respirators

Who Should Attend: Administrators and Safety and Health personnel who need to become familiar with OSHA respiratory requirements and employees who require respiratory awareness or refresher training.

Regulatory Requirements: OSHA 29CFR 1910.134