40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost:

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost:

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost:

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost:

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost: 

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

40 Hour HAZWOPER (5 Days)

40 HR HAZWOPER 

Course Description:

The HAZWOPER standard applies to five 5 groups of employers and their employees, including; employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances including hazardous waste and who are engaged in clean-up operations required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances that are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites; operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations and emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

Topics: 

Hazard recognition
Introduction to HAZWOPER regulations
Air monitoring methods and instrumentation
Toxicology and exposure guidelines
Respiratory protection
Site entry and reconnaissance and establishment of zones
Decontamination methods
Radiation
Response organization utilizing the Incident Command System
Chemical protective clothing
Table top scenarios and hands-on exercises
End of course exam

Who Should Attend: 
Employees who have duties requiring them to respond to uncontrolled releases as First Responders at the Operations level, Hazardous Materials Technicians, Hazardous Materials Specialists, and On-Scene Incident Commanders and employees who are expected to handle or clean up hazardous materials or waste should take the 40-hour HAZWOPER course. This course requires participants to don and doff chemically resistant clothing and participate in response activities. Individuals with medical restrictions should not take this course.

Regulatory Requirements: 
OSHA 29CFR 1910.120
EPA Resource Conservation/ Recovery Act (RCRA)

Class Hours:

8:00 am – 5:00 pm each day

Cost:

$599/pp

Registration:

Purchase tickets below via PayPal

OR

Email us at training@uascor.com or call us at 877-399-1698

ASK ABOUT OUR PRIVATE CLASSES FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION

workers wearing mask

Face Masks are the new Frontline Protective Measure

As some states begin to relax their shelter-in-place orders and re-open businesses to spark the economy, more and more people will be out of their homes mingling for the first time in months. As pharmaceutical companies work to find a vaccine to prevent this disease – keep in mind, there currently is no cure – people are clamoring to return to work.

As we all know, the work environment has changed. A quick visit to the grocery store will solidify the fact that people are concerned not only about staying safe but spreading a disease they may or may not have.

Face masks, once a covering mostly seen while visiting a hospital, have become the new go-to preventative safety tool.

The CDC reports that; a significant portion of individuals with coronavirus lack symptoms (“asymptomatic”) and that even those who eventually develop symptoms (“pre-symptomatic”) can transmit the virus to others before showing symptoms.  This means that the virus can spread between people interacting in close proximity—for example, speaking, coughing, or sneezing—even if those people are not exhibiting symptoms. 

Many States Now Require Wearing Face Coverings in Public

On April 18th Rhode Island made it mandatory for all employees of construction businesses, and manufacturers to wear cloth face masks while at work. And these businesses are mandated to provide face coverings for their employees. Face coverings can include scarves, bandanas, and other homemade and non-factory-made masks. Rhode Island also provides guidance on wearing face masks at work.

While many states do require wearing face coverings in pubic, some states do not. This can cause confusion among people as to what is expected as the proper way to navigate in public settings.

CDC Provides Guidance on Wearing Masks

CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain. And while wearing a mask does not protect you, it can help protect others. They also still recommend you stay at least 6 feet away from other people (social distancing), frequent hand cleaning and other everyday preventive actions. Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children younger than 2 years of age, anyone who has trouble breathing.

Safety Measures for Your Workplace

Face masks are becoming the new normal for all work environments. And while masks can help stop the spread of the virus, many more safety measures will need to be initiated to ensure your working environment provides the level of safety for workers and customers expect.

We’ve developed two Safety Service programs to help you stay current with state and local government safety mandates:

COVID-19 CONSULTING BUNDLE – Written directive/policy on requirements which can be either a corporate policy or a site-specific policy.

COVID-19 TRAINING (INFECTION CONTROL WEBINAR) – We offer Open Enrollment Classes and Private Company Sponsored Classes made available at your convenience.

If you have concerns about your workforce and coronavirus, please contact us today to learn about steps you can take to protect yourself, your family, and your employees.

tempature-screening2

MA / RI / CT Employers may have to cease operations COVID 19 / Coronavirus

According to a recent article in SouthCoastToday – Blue Harvest Fisheries of New Bedford, MA, was ordered to shut down and cease operations by the city’s Board of Health. This order went into effect after three employees there tested positive for COVID-19 with a 14-day period.

The order also calls for the company to have a designated COVID-19 Health and Safety officer in charge of recording staff temperatures at the beginning and end of their shifts, communicating COVID-19- related information to the city’s Health Department, ensuring all staff wear face coverings and shields and stay at least six feet apart from one another on the production line, and ensuring culturally and linguistically appropriate COVID-19 safety information is displayed in conspicuous locations throughout the facility.

Food processing companies across the country have seen cases of COVID-19

Blue Harvest Fisheries is not the only food processing company to be hit by COVID-19.

A Washington Post investigation has found three of the nation’s largest meat processors failed to provide protective gear to all workers, and some employees say they were told to continue working in crowded plants even while sick as the coronavirus spread around the country and turned the facilities into infection hot spots.

Tyson Foods, JBS USA and Smithfield Foods have closed 15 processing plants due to improper social distancing and the lack of personal protective equipment.

COVID-19 safety testing measures are the “new normal”

With the urge to start reopening our economy, many states are starting to ease the stay-at-home mandate and allowing certain businesses to reopen.

As we all feel the need to get back to work and restart our economy, we must realize that as we do this, business as usual will be anything but normal.  Many new safety measures will need to be in place and adhered to for both employees and customers to feel comfortable enough to go back to work and shop our local businesses.

After speaking with our corporate, construction, retail, educational, and sports league’s leaders, we have determined that fever screenings are becoming the “new normal” and are being built into the workforce and visitor access protocols for the long term.

As you know, employee protection, business continuity, customer service, and service excellence are at the core of what we do at OccuMed of New England. Fitting into these core values is the recent development of our newest service package which is to bring our paramedic staff and fever screening device, to our current and future customers and partners.   

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, employers, and public safety organizations are implementing temperature screening policies as they prepare for the re-opening of the workplace and public buildings that have been ordered to close in an effort to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

Forehead thermometers have been traditionally used for this practice. We have coupled the temperature monitoring with our proven compliance auditing software to administer an efficient method which does not put our screeners at risk and does not perpetuate the possibility of cross-contamination due to close contact within the workspace.

COVID-19 Safety Services to Protect Your Workers and Customers

Our bundled COVID 19 /Coronavirus services system allows for quickly screening and detecting individuals with an elevated temperature. Utilizing a thermal thermometer in conjunction with our mobile app, we provide a solution that will alert employers and the workforce when a scanned person’s temperature exceeds a predetermined threshold, allowing for immediate intervention and protective measures.

We have furthered our efforts by creating a COVID 19 / Coronavirus written administrative policy process, training solutions and inspection processes that will ensure our current and future customers and partners are not at risk of jeopardizing their employee’s health and wellbeing or their ability to continue to operate in a safe and profitable manner

The following is included in our service package individually or bundled:

  1. COVID-19 written directive/policy on requirements which can be either a corporate policy or a site-specific policy.
  2. Daily On-site medical monitoring briefing at the start of each shift on current COVID-19 concerns.
  3. Daily administration of a COVID-19 acknowledgment form to each employee verifying their understanding of the requirements of the COVID-19 guidelines; this process also includes the individual monitoring of employee’s body temperatures along with a verification that the employee has not had any symptoms of COVID-19 or has come in contact with any individuals that have tested positive for COVID-19. (Testing is completed with FDA approved equipment and under FDA testing periodicals).
  4. Sitewide COVID-19 compliance audit to assure each the contractor on-site is meeting the requirements.
  5. COVID-19 audit summary report for an audit conducted at the project site.
  6. Incident Reporting: If in any case in an employee is found to be showing the signs or symptoms of COVID-19 our on-site representative will follow through with a full investigation which includes an incident report.
  7. Training Services: As part of the services we offer our clients training on infectious control for site supervisors, that will be responsible for monitoring for COVID-19 compliance and conditions outside of OccuMed’s daily audit/inspection.
  8. Record Retention: OccuMed will maintain all records of the services including the daily reports, individual acknowledgment forms (which include the temperatures), and any investigation reports are conducted.

If you have concerns about your workforce and coronavirus, learn more about our custom COVID-19 Safety Consulting Services and contact us directly to talk with our team today.

OSHA Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19
Ten Steps All Workplaces Can Take to Reduce Risk of Exposure to Coronavirus
Coronavirus Fact Sheet
Coronavirus Symptoms
Help Stop the Spread
Public Health Management Decision-Making

woman worker with mask

Simple Guidelines for All Workers and Employers to Stay Safe from COVID-19

United Alliance is committed to protecting the health and safety of America’s workers and workplaces during these unprecedented times. To that end, we’re providing up to date information from multiple sources to give you the information you need to ensure a safer workplace.

As the numbers of people affected with COVID-19 seem to be leveling off in some areas, now is not the time to become complacent. In time, we all hope, the economy will rebound, and people will resume their “normal” daily lives.

However, for those workers whose job are considered essential and are unable to adhere to the shelter in place guidance, the risk of infection is still a major concern.

Below we’ve compiled a quick list of simple steps to take while on the jobsite to remain safe.

Before we discuss these steps, let’s recap about what we’re all dealing with…

What is Coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are common in humans and many different species of animals, including camels, cattle, cats, and bats. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can infect people and then spread between people, such as with MERS and SARS. COVID-19 is spreading person-to-person in China and some limited person-to-person transmission has been reported in countries outside China, including the United States. However, respiratory illnesses like seasonal influenza, are currently widespread in many US communities.

Symptoms of COVID-19

Symptoms of COVID-19 Infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can cause illness ranging from mild to severe and, in some cases, can be fatal. Symptoms typically include fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Some people infected with the virus have reported experiencing other non-respiratory symptoms. Other people, referred to as asymptomatic cases, have experienced no symptoms at all. According to the CDC, symptoms of COVID-19 may appear in as few as 2 days or as long as 14 days after exposure.

General Guidance for All Workers and Employers

According to OSHA, employers should adopt infection control strategies based on a thorough hazard assessment, using appropriate combinations of engineering and administrative controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) to prevent worker exposures.

For all workers, regardless of specific exposure risks, it is always a good practice to:

  • Frequently wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. When soap and running water are unavailable, use an alcohol-based hand rub with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands that are visibly soiled.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Practice good respiratory etiquette, including covering coughs and sneezes.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home if sick.
  • Recognize personal risk factors. According to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), certain people, including older adults and those with underlying conditions such as heart or lung disease or diabetes, are at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19.

Simple Steps to Take to Stay Safe

  1. Identify and Isolate Suspected Cases

Prompt identification and isolation of potentially infectious individuals is a critical first step in protecting workers, visitors, and others at the worksite.

2. Clean and Decontaminate the Work Environment

Carefully evaluate whether or not work areas occupied by people suspected to have the virus may have been contaminated and whether or not they need to be decontaminated in response.

3. Properly Train Workers

Teach them about the sources of exposure to the virus, the hazards associated with that exposure, and appropriate workplace protocols in place to prevent or reduce the likelihood of exposure.

4. Initiate Professional Safety Training Programs

In these challenging times, the risk of exposure on your job site is more prevalent than ever.

We offer two Safety Service Options:

COVID-19 CONSULTING BUNDLE – Written directive/policy on requirements which can be either a corporate policy or a site-specific policy.

COVID-19 TRAINING (INFECTION CONTROL WEBINAR) – We offer Open Enrollment Classes and Private Company Sponsored Classes made available at your convenience.

If you have concerns about your workforce and coronavirus, please contact us today to learn about steps you can take to protect yourself, your family, and your employees.

Download Further Information:

OSHA Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19
Ten Steps All Workplaces Can Take to Reduce Risk of Exposure to Coronavirus
Coronavirus Fact Sheet
Coronavirus Symptoms
Help Stop the Spread
Public Health Management Decision-Making

checklistv2

Coronavirus Checklist to Protect Your Company

As the Coronavirus continues to wreak havoc on the World economy, business owners are struggling to keep the lights on. If your business has been impacted, here are steps you can take to protect your business and keep it running.

A recent Bloomberg article; The Coronavirus Checklist: Nine Steps to Protect Your Company, provides insight into creating a crisis management plan. The spoke with a dozen crisis planning and supply chain experts about how to prepare for continued complications from the coronavirus, as well as future disruptions. Here are the recommended steps:

  1. Have a Plan in Place (or craft one quickly) – this will help to keep your business running. The Bloomberg article suggests the following:

    Emergency response and safety. This is making sure people and facilities are safe.
    Crisis management and communications. Analyzing the situation and informing staff, media, suppliers, and customers of the crisis and the plan.
    IT recovery. The tech department protects corporate information, hardware, and software.
    Business continuity. Keeping essential operations running.
  2. Establish workplace redundancy – consider off-site and online options as backups for your business files and products
  3. Update your HR guidelines – include remote work rules, family medical leave allowances, and a communicable illness policy
  4. Identify critical operations – figure out your critical needs, such as raw materials or subcontractors, and plan for how you would maintain those supplies and relationships.
  5. Assemble skeleton staffs – in the event if critical personnel are unable to work, have others ready to step in
  6. Work those connections with companies you rely on – communicate with key customers and suppliers to build on your personal relationships, and leverage when/if needed
  7. Defuse your supply chain time bomb – start building up backups to supplies needed, then start building backups to those backups. Supply chains are strained enough, now is the time to build a buffer.
  8. Think creatively – If your inventory is held up, do you have alternative markets to sell in? If not, start thinking about alternatives

If you have concerns about your workforce and coronavirus, please contact us today to learn about steps you can take to protect yourself, your family, and your employees.

Download Further Information:

Coronavirus Fact Sheet
Coronavirus Symptoms
Help Stop the Spread
Public Health Management Decision-Making

coughing construction worker-min

Recording Workplace Exposures to COVID-19

If your employee contracts Covid-19 at work, is it recordable on your OSHA log?

Here is what OSHA is saying:

Recording workplace exposures to COVID-19

OSHA recordkeeping requirements at 29 CFR Part 1904 mandate covered employers record certain work-related injuries and illnesses on their OSHA 300 log.

COVID-19 can be a recordable illness if a worker is infected as a result of performing their work-related duties. However, employers are only responsible for recording cases of COVID-19 if all of the following are met:

  1. The case is a confirmed case of COVID-19 (see CDC information on persons under investigation and presumptive positive and laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19);
  2. The case is work-related, as defined by 29 CFR 1904.5; and
  3. The case involves one or more of the general recording criteria set forth in 29 CFR 1904.7 (e.g. medical treatment beyond first-aid, days away from work).

Visit OSHA’s Injury and Illness Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements page for more information. 

If you have concerns about your workforce and coronavirus, please contact us today to learn about steps you can take to protect yourself, your family, and your employees.

Download Further Information:

Coronavirus Fact Sheet
Coronavirus Symptoms
Help Stop the Spread
Public Health Management Decision-Making

COVID-19-handwashing

COVID-19 Outbreak in the US – Steps To Take To Stay Safe

As the coronavirus continues to spread, not only abroad but also here in the United States, and treatment has not yet been identified, the CDC recommends the following steps to remain vigilant.

Employees who are well but who have a sick family member at home with COVID-19 should notify their supervisor and refer to CDC guidance for how to conduct a risk assessment of their potential exposure.

The public health guidelines from the CDC’s risk assessment guidelines for workplaces recommend that people with low-risk exposures to SARS-CoV-2 do not need to be restricted from public places, including workplaces, as long as they remain asymptomatic.

Asymptomatic people with low-risk exposures are advised to self-observe until 14 days after their last potential exposure. Employers may choose to recommend that employees with low-risk exposures check their temperature to ensure they are still asymptomatic before arriving at the workplace.

People with confirmed COVID-19 should remain in isolation, either at home or in a healthcare facility as determined by clinical status, until they are determined by state or local public health authorities in coordination with CDC to be no longer infectious.

The location of isolation will be determined by public health authorities and isolation may be compelled by public health order, if necessary.

Asymptomatic people with medium-risk exposures are recommended to avoid congregate settings, limit public activities, and practice social distancing.

Employers may consider on a case-by-case basis, after consultation with state or local public health authorities, whether asymptomatic employees with medium-risk exposures may be able to work onsite. These decisions should take into account whether individual employees’ work responsibilities and locations allow them to remain separate from others during the entire workday.

Asymptomatic employees with medium-risk exposures who are permitted to work onsite should not enter crowded workplace locations such as meeting spaces or cafeterias.

If an employee is confirmed to have COVID-19 infection, employers should inform fellow employees of their possible exposure to COVID-19 in the workplace but maintain confidentiality as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Employees exposed to a co-worker with confirmed COVID-19 should refer to CDC guidance for how to conduct a risk assessment of their potential exposure.

If you have concerns about your workforce and coronavirus, please contact us today to learn about steps you can take to protect yourself, your family, and your employees.

Now that COVID-19 has reached the U.S., employers need to plan to be able to respond in a flexible way to varying levels of severity and be prepared to refine their business response plans as needed. 

For the general American public, such as workers in non-healthcare settings and where it is unlikely that work tasks create an increased risk of exposures to COVID-19, the immediate health risk from COVID-19 is considered low. 

The CDC and its partners continue to monitor national and international data on the severity of illness caused by COVID-19 and will disseminate the results of these ongoing surveillance assessments, while making additional recommendations as needed.

Planning Considerations 

All employers need to consider how best to decrease the spread of acute respiratory illness and lower the impact of COVID-19 in their workplace. They should identify and communicate their objectives, which may include one or more of the following: 

(a) reducing transmission among staff, 

(b) protecting people who are at higher risk for adverse health complications, 

(c) maintaining business operations, and 

(d) minimizing adverse effects on other entities in their supply chains. 

Some of the key considerations when making decisions on appropriate responses are:

1. Disease severity (i.e., number of people who are sick, hospitalization and death rates) in the community where the business is located;

2. Impact of disease on employees that are vulnerable and may be at higher risk for COVID-19 adverse health complications. Inform employees that some people may be at higher risk for severe illness, such as older adults and those with chronic medical conditions. 

3. Prepare for possible increased numbers of employee absences due to illness in employees and their family members, dismissals of early childhood programs and K-12 schools due to high levels of absenteeism or illness:

  • Employers should plan to monitor and respond to absenteeism at the workplace. Implement plans to continue your essential business functions in case you experience higher than usual absenteeism.
  • Cross-train personnel to perform essential functions so that the workplace is able to operate even if key staff members are absent.
  • Assess your essential functions and the reliance that others and the community have on your services or products.
  • Be prepared to change your business practices if needed to maintain critical operations (e.g., identify alternative suppliers, prioritize customers, or temporarily suspend some of your operations if needed).

4. Employers with more than one business location are encouraged to provide local managers with the authority to take appropriate actions outlined in their business infectious disease outbreak response plan based on the condition in each locality.  

5. Coordination with state external and local external health officials is strongly encouraged for all businesses so that timely and accurate information can guide appropriate responses in each location where their operations reside. 

Since the intensity of an outbreak may differ according to geographic location, local health officials will be issuing guidance specific to their communities.

If you have concerns about your workforce and coronavirus, please contact us today to learn about steps you can take to protect yourself, your family, and your employees.

If you have concerns about your workforce and coronavirus, please contact us today to learn about steps you can take to protect yourself, your family, and your employees.

All employers should be ready to implement strategies to protect their workforce from COVID-19 while ensuring continuity of operations.

During a COVID-19 outbreak, all sick employees should stay home and away from the workplace, respiratory etiquette and hand hygiene should be encouraged, and routine cleaning of commonly touched surfaces should be performed regularly.

Employers should:

  1. Ensure your Infectious Disease Outbreak Response plan is flexible and involve your employees in developing and reviewing your plan.
  2. Conduct a focused discussion or exercise using your plan, to find out ahead of time whether the plan has gaps or problems that need to be corrected.
  3. Share your plan with employees and explain what human resources policies, workplace and leave flexibilities, and pay and benefits will be available to them.
  4. Share best practices with other businesses in your communities (especially those in your supply chain), chambers of commerce, and associations to improve community response efforts.

Recommendations for an Infectious Disease Outbreak Response Plan

Identify possible work-related exposure and health risks to your employees. OSHA has more information on how to protect workers from potential exposures external to COVID-19 at https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/covid-19/.

Review human resources policies to make sure that policies and practices are consistent with public health recommendations and are consistent with existing state and federal workplace laws (for more information on employer responsibilities, visit the Department of Labor’s and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s websites).

Explore whether you can establish policies and practices, such as flexible worksites (e.g., telecommuting) and flexible work hours (e.g., staggered shifts), to increase the physical distance among employees and between employees and others if state and local health authorities recommend the use of social distancing strategies. For employees who are able to telework, supervisors should encourage employees to telework instead of coming into the workplace until symptoms are completely resolved. Ensure that you have the information technology and infrastructure needed to support multiple employees who may be able to work from home.

Identify essential business functions, essential jobs or roles, and critical elements within your supply chains (e.g., raw materials, suppliers, subcontractor services/products, and logistics) required to maintain business operations. Plan for how your business will operate if there is increasing absenteeism or these supply chains are interrupted.

Set up authorities, triggers, and procedures for activating and terminating the company’s infectious disease outbreak response plan, altering business operations (e.g., possibly changing or closing operations in affected areas), and transferring business knowledge to key employees. Work closely with your local health officials to identify these triggers.

Plan to minimize exposure between employees and also between employees and the public, if public health officials call for social distancing.

Establish a process to communicate information to employees and business partners on your infectious disease outbreak response plans and latest COVID-19 information. Anticipate employee fear, anxiety, rumors, and misinformation, and plan communications accordingly.

In some communities, early childhood programs and K-12 schools may be dismissed, particularly if COVID-19 worsens. Determine how you will operate if absenteeism spikes from increases in sick employees, those who stay home to care for sick family members, and those who must stay home to watch their children if dismissed from school. Businesses and other employers should prepare to institute flexible workplace and leave policies for these employees. Local conditions will influence the decisions that public health officials make regarding community-level strategies; employers should take the time now to learn about plans in place in each community where they have a business.

Now that the COVID-19 outbreak has reached the US, consider canceling non-essential business travel to additional countries per travel guidance on the CDC website. Travel restrictions may be enacted by other countries which may limit the ability of employees to return home if they become sick while on travel status.

Consider cancelling large work-related meetings or events.

Engage state external and local external health departments to confirm channels of communication and methods for dissemination of local outbreak information.

If you have concerns about your workforce and coronavirus, please contact us today to learn about steps you can take to protect yourself, your family, and your employees.

If you have concerns about your workforce and coronavirus, please contact us today to learn about steps you can take to protect yourself, your family, and your employees.

Download Further Information:

Coronavirus Fact Sheet
Coronavirus Symptoms
Help Stop the Spread
Public Health Management Decision-Making