confined space warning

Can Your Company Afford $420,000 in Penalties?

Employees have a basic right to be able to work safely at their site, in their office, or in the field, and it is up to employers to meet the standards set by OSHA across a number of industries to meet those guidelines. Unfortunately, for any number of reasons that may not always take place and the results are harmful or even deadly.

In Hugo, OK, the US Department of Labor cited Trinity Rail and Maintenance Services for confined space violations in August 2020 fatality investigation. OSHA determined that an employee of Trinity Rail and Maintenance Services Inc. became unresponsive after entering a natural gasoline rail car with the intent of cleaning the space in August of 2020. A second employee entered the rail car and was also overcome after attempting to rescue the fallen worker.

Unfortunately, both workers lost their lives during this incident.

After an investigation, OSHA concluded that the company had numerous violations. Two of these were willful violations, defined as: a violation in which the employer either knowingly failed to comply with a legal requirement (purposeful disregard) or acted with plain indifference to employee safety.

As a result, a proposed fine of $419,347 was levied against Trinity Rail and Maintenance Services.

An unexpected tragedy at a worksite is always an uncomfortable topic to discuss. It doesn’t need to be this way however. Permit Required Confined Space Entry Courses provide the practices and procedures to protect employees from the hazards of entry into Permit Required Confined Spaces. These types of courses are vital to keep accidents such as the one in Oklahoma from being repeated, and keeps your business from bearing an additional financial burden from these incidents.

Pile of documents with Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA.

March 2 Deadline For 300 Log Electronic Reporting Compliance

March 2 is the deadline for employers to file directly with OSHA their 300A and two other reports—Forms 300 and 301.

OSHA provides in-depth information regarding filing the form 300A. Below, is a summary of important requirements taken from their website to help navigate the filing requirements.

Recordkeeping Requirements

Many employers with more than 10 employees are required to keep a record of serious work-related injuries and illnesses. (Certain low-risk industries are exempted.) Minor injuries requiring first aid only do not need to be recorded.

This information helps employers, workers and OSHA evaluate the safety of a workplace, understand industry hazards, and implement worker protections to reduce and eliminate hazards -preventing future workplace injuries and illnesses.

COVID-19 can be a recordable illness if a worker is infected due to performing work-related duties. However, employers are only responsible for recording cases of COVID-19 if all of the following are true:

  1. The case is a confirmed case of COVID-19 (see CDC information on persons under investigation and presumptive positive and laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19);
  2. The case is work-related (as defined by 29 CFR 1904.5); and
  3. The case involves one or more of the general recording criteria set forth in 29 CFR 1904.7 (e.g., medical treatment beyond first aid, days away from work).

Maintaining and Posting Records

Keep in mind, records must be maintained at the worksite for at least five years. Each February through April, employers must post a summary of the injuries and illnesses recorded the previous year. Also, if requested, copies of the records must be provided to current and former employees, or their representatives.

Who needs to file:

Only a small fraction of establishments is required to electronically submit their Form 300A data to OSHA. Establishments that meet any of the following criteria DO NOT have to send their information. Remember, these criteria apply at the establishment level, not to the firm as a whole.

  • The establishment’s peak employment during the previous calendar year was 19 or fewer, regardless of the establishment’s industry.
  • The establishment’s industry is on this list, regardless of the size of the establishment.
  • The establishment had a peak employment between 20 and 249 employees during the previous calendar year AND the establishment’s industry is not on this list.

How to file:

OSHA provides a secure website that offers three options for data submission. Users can manually enter data into a web form or upload a CSV file to process multiple establishments at the same time. Those using automated recordkeeping systems will have the ability to transmit data electronically.

We’re Here to Help

The current reporting requirements can be confusing and difficult to follow. It’s important to stay up to date to avoid unnecessary OSHA fines and penalties. If you need help meeting this filing deadline, contact us today.

We can help with:

OSHA CONSULTING BUNDLE – Written directive/policy on requirements which can be either a corporate policy or a site-specific policy.

OSHA TRAINING  – We offer Open Enrollment Classes, Online Courses, and Private Company Sponsored Classes made available at your convenience.

If you have concerns about your workforce and coronavirus, please contact us today to learn about steps you can take to protect yourself, your family, and your employees.

 

OSHA Safety Program

Core Elements to Starting Your OSHA Health & Safety Program

Starting a OSHA Health and Safety Program is key to providing a safe work environment, and is one of the most effective ways of protecting your employees from unnecessary harm or illness.

According to the National Safety Council (NSC), the total cost of work injuries in 2019 was $171.0 billion. This figure includes wage and productivity losses of $53.9 billion, medical expenses of $35.5 billion, and administrative expenses of $59.7 billion.

The cost per worker in 2019 was $1,100.

OSHA provides a straightforward approach to setting up your safety and health program with seven core elements. Last week, we discussed the 10 Easy Things to Get Your Program Started

Today we’ll review the first element: Management Leadership

Initiating a health and safety program is relatively easy. The difficult part is getting everyone in your workplace onboard with the plan.

This all starts with management.

Management provides the leadership, vision, and resources needed to implement an effective safety and health program. When we speak about management leadership, we’re referring to business owners, managers, and supervisors – anyone who is considered able to make decisions for the good of the overall business.

As a manager, the overall goal of starting, or revamping, a health and safety program is to:

  • Make worker safety and health a core organizational value.
  • Eliminate hazards, protect workers, and continuously improving workplace safety and health.
  • Provide the resources needed to implement and maintain the program.
  • Demonstrate and communicate their safety and health commitment to workers and others.
  • Set an example through their own actions.

Four Action Items to Take

This can seem daunting, at first glance.

But OSHA provides insight into four action items any management team member can take to get the process started, and how keep it going.

Below is a summary of each action item.

Action item 1: Communicate your commitment to a safety and health program

A clear, written policy helps you communicate that safety and health is a primary organizational value –as important as productivity, profitability, product or service quality, and customer satisfaction.

Action item 2: Define program goals

By establishing specific goals and objectives, management sets expectations for managers, supervisors, and workers and for the program overall. The goals and objectives should focus on specific actions that will improve workplace safety and health.

Action item 3: Allocate resources

Provide the resources needed to implement the safety and health program, pursue program goals, and address program shortcomings when they are identified.

Action item 4: Expect performance

Lead the program effort by establishing roles and responsibilities and providing an open, positive environment that encourages communication about safety and health.

A quick reminder…

Maintaining a positive and encouraging tone is important.

A successful program rewards, rather than disciplines, workers who identify problems or concerns. Disciplinary measures should be reserved for situations in which an individual manager or worker is uncooperative or becomes an impediment to progress.

This type of reaction is counterproductive to the overall goal. Taking the person aside to discuss their behavior, and how it affects others, is important to establishing the ground rules of acceptable behavior. Remind this person that the program isn’t intended to make their job harder but to ensure their safety and the safety and wellbeing of everyone.

Don’t Go It Alone

Starting a Health and Safety Program takes time, effort, and commitment from everyone. If you need guidance on getting your safety and health program started – we’re here to help.

We work with many companies with the following services:

OSHA CONSULTING BUNDLE – Written directive/policy on requirements which can be either a corporate policy or a site-specific policy.

OSHA TRAINING  – We offer Open Enrollment Classes, Online Courses, and Private Company Sponsored Classes made available at your convenience.

If you have concerns about your workforce and coronavirus, please contact us today to learn about steps you can take to protect yourself, your family, and your employees.

OSHA Inspections

New OSHA Citation Penalty Amounts for 2021

In 2015, OSHA began making annual adjustments to its maximum penalties after Congress passed the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act. This Act requires civil monetary penalties be adjusted for inflation by Jan. 15 of each year.

In keeping with the Act, new citation penalty amounts have been published. Effective January 15, 2021, the U.S. Department of Labor published a final rule setting forth the following adjustments to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) civil penalty amounts based on cost-of-living adjustments:

Below are the common violations related to the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act). You can view all the penalties increases here.

Violation Old Fine New Fine
Failure to correct a violation for which a citation has been issued under section 9(a) of the OSH Act within the period permitted for the correction. $13,494 $13,653

 

Violation of the requirements of section 5 of the OSH Act, any standard, rule or order promulgated under section 6 of the OSH Act, or applicable regulations $13,494 $13,653

 

Violation of any of the posting requirements, as prescribed under provisions of the OSH Act. $13,494 $13,653

 

Serious violation of the requirements of section 5 of the OSH Act, of any standard, rule, or order promulgated under section 6 of the OSH Act, or applicable regulations. $13,494 $13,653

 

Willfull or repeated violation of the requirements of section 5 of the OSH Act, any standards, rules or orders promulgated under section 6 of the OSH Act, or applicable regulations. $134,937 $136,532

 

 

OSHA Inspections – What You Need to Know

With the increase in penalties, there may also be an increase in OSHA inspections.

OSHA provides valuable information on why an inspection happens, what to do to prepare, the stages of the inspection, fines, and penalties, and your rights. See the steps you need to take here to be prepared.

We’re here to help

We offer the following services to help prevent and manage OSHA compliance issue:

OSHA CONSULTING BUNDLE – Written directive/policy on requirements which can be either a corporate policy or a site-specific policy.

OSHA TRAINING  – We offer Open Enrollment Classes, Online Courses, and Private Company Sponsored Classes made available at your convenience.

Please contact us today to learn about steps you can take to protect yourself and your employees.

fall protection course-min

EM385 FP Training Classes – March 16, 17, 18 – Don’t Miss Out!

It’s a training requirement that has hit many construction supervisors or project manager’s sites; yet, it still seems to be one of those training requirements that is not widely offered, even here in the Northeast.

The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has a 900-page manual that outlines the safety regulations for their job-sites, with many of the requirements being a bit stricter than OSHA regulations.

Every contractor and subcontractor on a UASCE-overseen job-site must have at least one person who is trained and competent on the specifics buried within those 900 pages of their Engineer Manual (EM) 385-1-1. There’s no getting out of it.

PM’s Need for EM 385 Training

Given the number of daily phone calls we receive from PMs who need the training ASAP in order to return to work, the UASCE has become more stringent on ensuring this training is completed. They are also doling out some hefty fines as well as issuing stop orders until the mandates are met – especially if you don’t have designated safety personnel on-site.

Thankfully, we have several highly competent and trained construction professionals who have poured over the complete 900 pages and have designed a training program that ensures compliance.

Our EM 385 Compliance training, often referred to as 24 Hour Competent Person Fall Protection, is one of our most sought out training – often after being kicked off a job site. Those same trainers are able to also assist in meeting the requirements of having a Site Safety and Health Officer (SSHO) and Quality Control Manager, Quality Assurances Manager (QA/QC) on-site quickly.

Federal Bid Requirement

If you’re planning on bidding on a federal contract that takes place in Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, and New Jersey or on any of the bases listed below, be sure to reach out to us to secure your training.

This will no doubt save your company money, fines, and lost work time and make you the star employee of the week.

We can promise you that somewhere, tucked away in the fine print, the USACE requires you to have at least one person training in EM 385, 24 Hour Competent Person Fall Protection on your site at ALL times. There aren’t any loopholes or fast-talking yourself out of the requirement.

It also doesn’t exempt you from following OSHA regulations and our course clearly outlines the differences between the two. Because of this, we strongly recommend that all persons in our EM 385 training also have completed their OSHA 10 Hour Construction training. For an added peace of mind, we strongly recommend you train multiple employees to ensure that you always have someone available in case of injury, illness, or time-off requests.

We’ve clocked thousands of hours of training on this topic at various bases and our experts can help your team members understand the complexities of the UASCE requirements, ensure their fall arrest systems are safe and in compliance, and know their responsibilities on a job site.

Projects on Bases

If you have any upcoming projects in VT, NH, MA, RI, CT, NY or NJ at any of these bases*, be sure to call us today to secure your training dates or SSHO and/or QA/QC needs:

Massachusetts

Barnes Air National Guard Base, Westfield, MA
Otis Air National Guard Base, Buzzards Bay, MA
Hanscom Airforce Base, Bedford, MA
Westover Air Reserve Base, Chicopee, MA
Fort Devens, Devens, MA
AIRSTA Cape Cod, Buzzards Bay, MA
AIRSTA Salem, Salem, MA
Aviation Station Ten Pound Island, Gloucester, MA

Rhode Island

Quonset Point Air National Guard Station, North Kingstown, RI
NS Newport, Newport RI

Connecticut

Marine Safety Center Marine Base in Groton, CT
Research And Development Center Coast Guard Groton, CT
Coast Guard Academy in New London, CT
Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, CT

New York

Fort Drum Army Base in Jefferson, NY
Fort Hamilton Army Base in Brooklyn, NY
US Military Academy Army Base in West Point, NY
Watervliet Arsenal Army Base in Watervliet, NY

New Jersey

McGuire Air Force Base in New Hanover, NJ
Fort Dix Army Base in Burlington, NJ
Fort Monmouth Army Base in Monmouth, NJ
Picatinny Arsenal Army Base in Morris County, NJ
Loran Support Unit Coast Guard Base in Wildwood, NJ
Training Center Cape May Coast Guard Cape May, NJ
NWS Earle Navy Base in Colts Neck, NJ
NAES Lakehurst Navy Base in Lakehurst, NJ

*This is not a complete list of military bases

Sign up for an EM385 24 Hour Fall Protection Training Class here.

To sign up for the next public class offering at United Alliance Services Corporation, visit our online calendar.

For more information, call 877-399-1698

osha inspection 2-min

How to Prepare for an OSHA Inspection

OSHA provides valuable information on why an inspection happens, what to do to prepare, the stages of the inspection, fines, and penalties, and your rights. You can download the Data Sheet here.

Below we’ve provided an overview of the information provided:

OSHA inspectors, called compliance safety and health officers, are experienced, well-trained industrial hygienists and safety professionals whose goal is to assure compliance with OSHA requirements and help employers and workers reduce on-the-job hazards and prevent injuries, illnesses, and deaths in the workplace.

Normally, OSHA conducts inspections without advance notice. Employers have the right to require compliance officers to obtain an inspection warrant before entering the worksite.

OSHA has jurisdiction over approximately 7 million worksites. The agency seeks to focus its inspection resources on the most hazardous workplaces in the following order of priority:

  1. Imminent danger situations—hazards that could cause death or serious physical harm receive top priority. Compliance officers will ask employers to correct these hazards immediately or remove endangered employees.
  2. Severe injuries and illnesses—employers must report:
    • All work-related fatalities within 8 hours.
    • All work-related inpatient hospitalizations, amputations, or losses of an eye within 24 hours.
  3. Worker Complaints—allegations of hazards or violations also receive a high priority. Employees may request anonymity when they file complaints.
  4. Referrals of hazards from other federal, state or local agencies, individuals, organizations or the media receive consideration for inspection.
  5. Targeted inspections—inspections aimed at specific high-hazard industries or individual workplaces that have experienced high rates of injuries and illnesses also receive priority.
  6. Follow-up inspections—checks for abatement of violations cited during previous inspections are also conducted by the agency in certain circumstances.

OSHA Penalties

Per the OSHA website, below are the maximum penalty amounts, with the annual adjustment for inflation, that may be assessed after Jan. 15, 2020.

Type of Violation Penalty
Serious Other-Than-Serious Posting Requirements $13,494 per violation  
Failure to Abate $13,494 per day beyond the abatement date
Willful or Repeated $134,937 per violation

Preparing for An OSHA Inspection   

The Safety and Health Magazine website provides an in-depth article on steps to take to prepare for an OSHA inspection.  

 There are three main components of an OSHA inspection:

  • An opening conference. The opening conference is a brief meeting during which the OSHA inspector will explain the purpose of the inspection.
  • A worksite “walkaround” The walkaround is the actual inspection.
  • A closing conference.

Opening Conference—The compliance officer will explain why OSHA selected the workplace for inspection and describe the scope of the inspection, walkaround procedures, employee representation, and employee interviews.

Walkaround—Following the opening conference, the compliance officer and the representatives will walk through the portions of the workplace covered by the inspection, inspecting for hazards that could lead to employee injury or illness.

Closing Conference—After the walkaround, the compliance officer holds a closing conference with the employer and the employee representatives to discuss the findings.

Learning About the Results

When an inspector finds violations of OSHA standards or serious hazards, OSHA may issue citations and fines. OSHA must issue a citation and proposed penalty within six months of the violation’s occurrence. Citations describe OSHA requirements allegedly violated, list any proposed penalties, and give a deadline for correcting the alleged hazards. Violations are categorized as willful, serious, other-than-serious, de minimis, failure to abate, and repeated.

Know Your Rights

If you do receive a citation or fine, keep in mind, you do have the right to an appeal. When OSHA issues a citation to an employer, it also offers the employer an opportunity for an informal conference with the OSHA Area Director to discuss citations, penalties, abatement dates, or any other information pertinent to the inspection.

How We Can Help

The defense of an OSHA inspection is a good offense. This means making sure your job sites are adhering to all the OSHA safety compliance requirements. Keep in mind, the highest percentage of inspections results from work-related to imminent danger situations—hazards that could cause death or serious physical harm.

These jobs can include numerous situations so it’s best to train and prepare your workers for any instance. Falls, back-ups, trenches, cranes, are but a few instances that proper training can help reduce the risk of serious injury or death.

If you want to keep your workers safe and avoid OSHA penalties and fines, we offer numerous training programs to choose from.

We also offer an Annual Safety and Compliance Program focused on 6 main areas to help you decrease workplace hazards and increase profits.

The Annual Safety and Compliance Program consists of:

1.            16 Hours – Initial Risk Assessment

2.            Job Hazard Assessment

3.            Development of Corporate Health & Safety Plan

4.            Safety Compliance Auditing, Inspections and Reporting

5.            Employee Training: OSHA or Applicable

6.            Corporate Health & Safety Management Support

Get started today with a Risk Assessment or contact us at: 877-399-1698

Man with an industrial hand injury

Form 300A – Injury Report Posting Deadline

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is reminding employers to post OSHA Form 300A, which lists a summary of the total number of job-related injuries and illnesses that occurred during 2019. The form must be posted between Feb. 1 and April 30.

This information was obtained directly from the OSHA website and provides an overview of reporting requirements.

Recordkeeping Requirements

Employers with more than 10 employees are required to keep a record of serious work-related injuries and illnesses. (Certain low-risk industries are exempted.) Minor injuries requiring first aid only do not need to be recorded.

How does OSHA define a recordable injury or illness?

  • Any work-related fatality.
  • Any work-related injury or illness that results in loss of consciousness, days away from work, restricted work, or transfer to another job.
  • Any work-related injury or illness requiring medical treatment beyond first aid.
  • Any work-related diagnosed case of cancer, chronic irreversible diseases, fractured or cracked bones or teeth, and punctured eardrums.

There are also special recording criteria for work-related cases involving: needlesticks and sharps injuries; medical removal; hearing loss; and tuberculosis.

Maintaining and Posting Records

The records must be maintained at the worksite for at least five years. Each February through April, employers must post a summary of the injuries and illnesses recorded the previous year. Also, if requested, copies of the records must be provided to current and former employees, or their representatives.

The recordkeeping forms can be found here: Injury & Illness Recordkeeping Forms –

300, 300A, 301

According to an article by EHS Today: the changes for this year were made by OSHA last year in order to reverse Obama-era agency requirements for electronic reporting of the three forms. Before the 2019 change, employers with 250 or more employees were required to electronically submit all three forms directly to OSHA. Under the rules change, employers with 250 or more employees and with 20 to 249 employees in certain designated industries must continue to electronically submit Form 300A each year.

Annual Safety and Compliance Program

United Alliance can help your company or organization develop, implement, and maintain a safety and health program that meets and exceeds OSHA safety requirements and in most cases is much more cost effective than managing the personnel and process internally.

Our Annual Safety and Compliance Program focuses on 6 main areas to help you decrease workplace hazards and increase profits.

The Annual Safety and Compliance Program consists of:

  1. 16 Hours – Initial Risk Assessment
  2. Job Hazard Assessment
  3. Development of Corporate Health & Safety Plan
  4. Safety Compliance Auditing, Inspections and Reporting
  5. Employee Training: OSHA or Applicable
  6. Corporate Health & Safety Management Support

Our senior consultants and instructional staff are qualified and experienced in creating occupational safety and health management solutions. We help our clients achieve a safer work environment, which typically results in a healthier bottom-line profit. We believe that companies who properly manage and budget their worker’s safety and health, are positioned to operate more efficiently and become more profitable.

Get started today with a Risk Assessment or contact us at: 877-399-1698

worker on the platform

Bridge Construction Mishap Stresses The importance of Ariel Lift Safety Training

NBC Boston recently reported one person was killed and a second badly injured in an accident at a bridge construction project on Interstate 495 in Haverhill, Massachusetts, on Wednesday morning.

A preliminary investigation showed the two workers fell from the bucket of a lift truck as they were working on a bridge over the Merrimack River. The workers fell onto a barge below.

The report goes on to state: The Massachusetts Coalition for Occupational Safety & Health (MassCOSH) released a statement saying that the “tragic event is a reminder that working at elevated heights remains a very dangerous job.” The agency added that employers should make sure OSHA-required safety measures are carefully implemented.

Though the cause of the falls remains under investigation, the importance of Aerial Safety training cannot be overlooked.

We offer an Aerial Lift Safety Awareness Course that is designed for employees who operate or work around aerial lifts. This provides participants with a basic understanding of the OSHA Standards governing aerial lifts and methods available to prevent fall hazards.

This course covers the following topics;

  • Review OSHA Standards governing aerial lifts
  • Discuss the hazards associated with operating aerial lifts
  • Understanding rated load capacities for lifting personnel, tools, and materials
  • General requirements regarding fall protection
  • Pre-planning techniques to avoid aerial lift related accidents
  • Training considerations

Accidents happen on the job site, sometimes too often. Though you can’t plan or prepare for every incident, you can provide the proper OSHA required training to ensure workers have the latest information on how to stay safe.

Looking for a review of your current Safety Plan? We provide Risk Assessments to help you navigate OSHA training requirements to stay compliant.

Worker using fall protection gear as a safety precaution he learned in em 385 training

UASC filling in EM385 FP Training lack in Northeast

It’s a training requirement that has hit many construction supervisor or project manager’s site; yet, it still seems to be one of those trainings that is not widely offered, even here in the Northeast. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has a 900-page manual that outlines the safety regulations for their job-sites, with many of the requirements being a bit stricter than OSHA regulations. Every contractor and subcontractor on a UASCE-overseen job-site must have at least one person who is trained and competent on the specifics buried within those 900 pages of their Engineer Manual (EM) 385-1-1. There’s no getting out of it.

PM’s Need for EM 385 Training

Given the amount of daily phone calls we receive from PMs who need the training ASAP in order to return to work, the UASCE has become more stringent on ensuring this training is completed. They are also doling out some hefty fines as well as issuing stop orders until the mandates are met – especially if you don’t have designated safety personnel on-site. Thankfully, we have several highly competent and trained construction professionals who have poured over the complete 900 pages and have designed a training program that ensures compliance. Our EM 385 Compliance training, often referred to as 24 Hour Competent Person Fall Protection, is one of our most sought out trainings – often after being kicked off a job site. Those same trainers are able to also assist on meeting the requirements of having a Site Safety and Health Officer (SSHO) and Quality Control Manager, Quality Assurances Manager (QA/QC) on-site quickly.

Federal Bid Requirement

If you’re planning on bidding on a federal contract that takes place in Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York and New Jersey or on any of the bases listed below, be sure to reach out to us to secure your training. This will no doubt save your company money, fines, and lost work-time and make you the star employee of the week. We can promise you that somewhere, tucked away in the fine print, the USACE requires you to have at least one person training in EM 385, 24 Hour Competent Person Fall Protection on your site at ALL times. There aren’t any loopholes or fast-talking yourself out of the requirement. It also doesn’t exempt you from following OSHA regulations and our course clearly outlines the differences between the two. Because of this, we strongly recommend that all persons in our EM 385 training also have completed their OSHA 10 Hour Construction training. For an added peace of mind, we strongly recommend you train multiple employees to ensure that you always have someone available in case of injury, illness, or time off requests.

We’ve clocked thousands of hours of training on this topic at various bases and our experts can help your team members understand the complexities of the UASCE requirements, ensure their fall arrest systems are safe and in compliance, and know their responsibilities on a job site.

Projects on Bases

If you have any upcoming projects in VT, NH, MA, RI, CT, NY or NJ at any of these bases*, be sure to call us today to secure your training dates or SSHO and/or QA/QC needs:

Massachusetts

Barnes Air National Guard Base, Westfield, MA
Otis Air National Guard Base, Buzzards Bay, MA
Hanscom Airforce Base, Bedford, MA
Westover Air Reserve Base, Chicopee, MA
Fort Devens, Devens, MA
AIRSTA Cape Cod, Buzzards Bay, MA
AIRSTA Salem, Salem, MA
Aviation Station Ten Pound Island, Gloucester, MA

Rhode Island

Quonset Point Air National Guard Station, North Kingstown, RI
NS Newport, Newport RI

Connecticut

Marine Safety Center Marine Base in Groton, CT
Research And Development Center Coast Guard Groton, CT
Coast Guard Academy in New London, CT
Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, CT

New York

Fort Drum Army Base in Jefferson, NY
Fort Hamilton Army Base in Brooklyn, NY
US Military Academy Army Base in West Point, NY
Watervilet Arsenal Army Base in Watervilet, NY

New Jersey

McGuire Air Force Base in New Hanover, NJ
Fort Dix Army Base in Burlington, NJ
Fort Monmouth Army Base in Monmouth, NJ
Picatinny Arsenal Army Base in Morris County, NJ
Loran Support Unit Coast Guard Base in Wildwood, NJ
Training Center Cape May Coast Guard Cape May, NJ
NWS Earle Navy Base in Colts Neck, NJ
NAES Lakehurst Navy Base in Lakehurst, NJ

*This is not a complete list of military bases

To sign up for an EM385 24 Hour Fall Protection Training Class, visit our website. To sign up for the next public class offering at United Alliance Services Corporation, visit our online calendar. For more information, call 774-302-4305.

uas-man-with-hard-hat-and-chop-saw-min

Do Personal Tasks That Lead To Accidents Need To Be Listed On OSHA 300 Log?

Why your OSHA 300 log with accidents that occur to employees while on their work breaks, need to be accurate.

Considering that in 2019, OSHA initial violations averaged $4,237. And, initial Recordkeeping violations averaged $3,878 (up from 2017 and 2018), with a maximum assessed fine of $132,598 for a repeat violation! It would make sense to be sure your OSHA Logs are in order.

Let’s consider an everyday scenario to further explore why this is so important.

How much risk does your company take on if an employee left your building during his lunch break and spent the time in his company truck?

Very little, you would think.

But – what if your good employee took his lunch break in his company truck, ate his lunch, listening to music and engaged in a personal task for the remainder of his break.  He needed to sharpen his pencil for a quick note and took out his pen-knife.  He remembered that his knife was a bit dull, so he went to his tool kit and retrieved his sharpening stone.  He sharpened his knife but cut his thumb and it began to bleed.  He was unable to control the bleeding so he called his supervisor and was taken to the emergency room for a couple of stitches and a tetanus shot.  Does this injury need to be recorded on the employers’ OSHA 300 log, for employers with over 10 employees?

Because there is an exception to the medical treatment rule that says preventative tetanus immunizations do not render the injury OSHA recordable, but getting stitches is beyond first aid and therefore defines the injury as recordable.  However, the injury happened while the employee was engaged in a personal task.  Employees can go to a retail store that they work at as a customer during off-work hours and if injured it is not recordable, right?

Does our knife-sharpening injury during a lunch break need to be recorded on an OSHA log?

The answer is yes!

This is solely because it was during work hours.  This, however, opens up a conflict between what the employer should allow employees to do during their work breaks.  Employers may want to rethink permitting employees to engage in risky activities on their work breaks.

For more information, see these Standard OSHA Interpretations, references and regulations.

We offer risk assessments and training courses to make sure your company is in compliance and avoid OSHA fines.

Contact us today to learn more.

Workplace Safety Handbook with OSHA Requirements next to A First Aid Kit, Respirator Face Piece, Hart Hat, and Safety Gloves

A Quick Guide on OSHA Safety Requirements

Weeding through letters of interpretation or researching OSHA standards for a quick answer can eat up precious time. This is why UASC’s safety consultants and training department wanted to provide you with a quick reference guide on our most commonly asked OSHA reporting, recording, and training questions.

Breaking Down What OSHA Wants

OSHA can be ambiguous in what they want in some cases. This is done intentionally so that workers have the most protection possible. However, there are some things that are black and white for employers to follow to help ensure the minimum requirements are being met. It’s important to ensure that your company is operating as safely as possible and our team is ready to help provide you with written health and safety plans (HASP), training, consulting, or a safety manager. In the meantime, here’s the bare minimum.

Companies are required to have a written safety program no matter what sector or industry they’re in. These help their employees work in the safest manner possible, and, per OSHA, must include the following topics:

  • Emergency Action Plan (EAP)
  • Fire Prevention Plan
  • Hazard Communication Program (HazComm)
  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
  • Lock-out/Tag-out (LOTO)

Beyond this, established safe work practices are required for all tasks. Additional written plans or supportive documentations may be required, which depends on the task(s), duties, or environment. A professional safety consultant can easily walk you through these steps to ensure full compliance, but this is a great starting point.

Simplifying Company Safety Plans

There are also required written safety programs when they’re applicable to your company’s work environment. If your employee’s job requires them to use any of the following, then you need to have a written safety plan.

  • Respirator Program
  • Bloodborne Pathogens Plan (BBP)
  • Firearm Safety Program
  • Firearm Range Safety Program
  • Aerial Lift Program
  • Trench Safety Program
  • Permit Required Confined Spaces Program
  • Asbestos Management Plan
  • Hearing Conservation Program
  • Arc Flash Program

Maintaining Up-to-Date Training Certifications

Once the safety plans and programs are written, you now need to teach them to your employees to ensure full understanding and compliance. Some of these areas require specific training to ensure full compliance, which often comes with a required “retraining” date to ensure all employees have a refresher to maintain the information. Should you make any of your policies, even if they just had the training a few weeks ago, then a new training session needs to happen to ensure complete compliance. Many companies choose to hire a third party instructor to deliver the content to their employees so that it’s coming from an outside source who has experience with OSHA regulations and training, such as UASC.

TopicFrequency
Asbestos Cement Pipe (water/sewer)Every 5 Years
Bloodborne Pathogens (BBP)Annual
Fire Extinguisher Annual
Forklift Training (PIV or PIT) Every 3 Years
Hazardous Waste Annual
Hearing ConservationAnnual
Respirators Annual

*An OSHA 10 or 30 Hour course does not satisfy job-specific training as it is simply an overview and not specific to job tasks. Looking to fulfill your training needs? Visit our calendar full of upcoming public courses, or check out our online and private course catalogs.

In addition to written safety manuals/policies and job specific training, inspections play a key part in keeping a worker safe. These inspections need to happen prior to each use with proper documentation, showing it’s been completed and the condition of the item is noted. OSHA requires the following items to always be routinely inspected and removed from service if they’re deemed damaged in any way.

Routine Inspections

Chains and SlingsFire Extinguishers
Cranes/HoistsLadders
Electrical GFCIMachine Guard
Emergency Detection
(lights, alarms, monitors, etc.)
Emergency Supplies
(First Aid, AED, eyewash, etc.)
Personal Arrest Fall ProtectionVehicles and Equipment

OSHA Assistance and Resources

These lists are provided as a courtesy to help understand what is required of companies per OSHA and OSHA may change their requirements at any time; thus, it is always important to have a safety consultant on hand to ensure complete compliance. Please feel free to reach out to us with any questions you may have regarding your safety manuals, policies, training, or inspections by visiting our website or giving us a call (774-302-4305). Providing a safe work environment ensure your employees go home to their families each day.

Man in a hardhat standing inside a warehouse

Assisting Mass Municipal Agencies in Preparing for the 2019 OSHA Requirements

Updated OSHA Compliance with MGL has begun!

Here is a simple one-pager on how United Alliance Services can help get you into compliance!

OSHA Safety Training for Municipalities & Schools

Beginning February 2019, public employees are required to provide OSHA safety training and maintain OSHA compliance with job sites and safety training.

OSHA – UASC Training for MUNICIPALITIES:

  • Address the OSHA training requirements specific to each department
  • Training standards help municipalities perform jobs safely reducing worker comp, medical leave times, and injuries on the job.
  • Choose up to six electives that best suits your team members.
  • We maintain copies of all training’s, so if your system is compromised, we have a backup.
  • We’ll notify you when refreshers need to be renewed, so it’s one less thing to fall through the cracks.
  • We have developed the training programs allowing you to focus on your area of expertise

Click here for OSHA Safety Training for Municipalities!

OSHA – UASC Training for SCHOOLS:

  • Experienced OSHA safety regulations instructors
  • Help school employees perform their jobs safely by outlining first-hand, real-life scenarios
  • You choose the sessions that best suit your team members as you know them best
  • We maintain backup copies of all training documentation
  • Notifications when refreshers need to be renewed
  • We have developed the training programs, which is our area of expertise, to allow you to focus on your area of expertise – running an efficient school system.

Click here for OSHA Safety Training for MA Schools!

Record Keeping

Prior to the new law, the public sector was exempt from maintaining an OSHA 300 log. The MA Department of Labor Standards (DLS) now states that you only need to provide your OSHA 300 log when an inspector or the Bureau of Labor Statistics requests to see it.

The best practice is to maintain an OSHA 300 log.

OSHA 300 Log for MA Public Sector

An OSHA 300 log is used by private sector employers with more than 10 employees to maintain a record of injuries and illnesses that took place and are referred to as a “recordable”.

All of the recordables are documented, but each record also needs a form 301 completed, which details the injury/illness.

A recordable includes any work-related illness and/or injury that results in:

• Fatality
• loss of consciousness, missed work, restricted work, transfer to a lower-risk job
• medical treatment beyond first aid
• diagnosis of a work-related cancer, chronic irreversible disease, fractured or cracked bones/teeth, and punctured eardrums
• any drugs being prescribed or taken at prescription strength

Needle-sticks and sharps injuries, medical removal, hearing loss, and tuberculosis have special recording criteria.