Construction worker looking at tired colleague wiping sweat at site

Beat the Heat on Construction Sites

In 2020, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) created a report on heat stress in the construction industry. Collecting information from hospital and OSHA reports, the CDC was able to come to conclusions that should be no surprise to anyone who has ever worked construction in the dog days of summer.

The CDC reported that around 12 people each year, over the past 24 years, lose their lives due to some form of heat related injuries (HRI). This number underestimates the severity of the situation due to the misclassification of injury reports. Heat related injuries are most abundant, as one would expect, between the months of June and August. The report states that heat can cause those who it affects to lose their focus and decision making capabilities. Normal mistakes, something as minor as falling off of a ladder or not checking your surroundings, are much more likely to occur, and traumatic injuries increase when experiencing extreme heat. From 2008-2010 the most common workplace injury for patients aged 19-45 were occupational HRI’s. Even the youngest, healthiest workers are susceptible to these HRI’s.

The CDC and OSHA have teamed together to provide tips on how to better manage the heat and humidity when out on the job. Regulations require that workers always have a sufficient amount of cold water handy at all times. Workers are also required to take mandatory rest breaks in order to limit work and pressure. Light colored, loosely fitting clothing are recommended as well.

HRI’s aren’t always obvious, if your employee begins to feel dizzy, slow, and tired have them step away for a break. When you and your employees show signs of heat exhaustion, make sure someone has the necessary knowledge and preparations to get them help.

construction_evening

Construction Site Injuries Can be Linked to Time of Day

According to a recent study from Oregon State University (OSU), the time of day, unsurprisingly, has an effect on injuries within the construction industry.

Liu Yang, a recent doctoral graduate from OSU, analyzed workers compensation injury claims by the hour of the accident. Yang found that workers often get hurt more often within the first 4 hours of the workday. The study also shows that night shifts experienced a significantly larger number of more frequent and more severe injuries as opposed to day shifts. The average number of days missed by an injured worker is just over 80, while the expenses incurred from these injuries averaged $12,000.

Data was collected entirely from the state of Oregon (who sees a higher percentage of construction related injuries than the national average) and focused on insurers who accepted “disabling” claims. The classification for disabling injuries is rather broad. A disabling industry could require a worker to take 3 days of leave or be a hospitalizing/fatal injury.

The authors noticed that while injuries were much more common during the first 4 hours, there were more severe injuries right after the mid-point in a workers’ day. The source theorizes that most workers take a mid-day break or lunch, allowing their bodies to recover. Skipping or delaying this break for whatever reason, may be a huge factor in the susceptibility to injury. This theory emphasizes the necessity of working at a safe pace with the right amount of breaks.

Yang claims that the two interventions that she thinks could help reduce workplace injuries the most are increased supervision by a safety staffer and an increase in rest and meal breaks.

Group of construction workers on building site.Stock photo

Keeping Your Construction Site Safe – What You Need to Know

It’s safe to say, construction is a high hazard industry.

Comprised of a wide range of activities, construction workers engage in many activities that may expose them to serious hazards.

According to the 2020 Liberty Mutual Workplace Safety Index report, the top 5 five injuries from construction sites – falls to lower level, struck by object, overextension, falls to same level, and hit by vehicle – accounted for $7.87 billion in costs.

Providing a safe construction worksite is key to maintaining healthy workers and keeping the job on schedule.

To accomplish this, many companies hire a full-time safety advisor. This person is typically responsible for in-house safety programs, managing OSHA related inspections, and training workers. In a perfect world, this works fine. However, finding and hiring for this role can be challenging.

Keep Your Project On-Track

Many construction companies rely on out-sources construction site safety services that augment an existing in-house safety team. This helps to free up the company from the challenge of finding and hiring safety consultants for special projects.

When a construction project requires specific expertise, adding this type of resource can make the difference between winning or losing the bid.

Out-sourced safety services can be used on new construction projects, shutdowns, or maintenance-related activities. If one of the safety consultants becomes unavailable because of illness or other reasons, they can quickly be replaced, without sacrificing quality or missing project deadlines.

United Alliance Services’ qualified Safety Advisors work with your team to integrate safety on your project, from the initial planning stages to the daily task-specific toolbox meetings. Our motivated team of professionals understands that safety, quality, and productivity work hand-in-hand.

Construction Site Safety Services

We work with many construction companies in a variety of ways.

  1. OSHA State and Federal Laws
    OSHA construction safety standards can be overwhelming. We can help you anticipate and meet the legal requirements for worker safety.
  2. Safety Programs and Site-Specific Plans
    Whether it’s a new safety program you need or just an update of your current safety program to meet new requirements, we can help to develop a specialized set of standards, policies and procedures. The potential safety program components are based on construction standards from OSHA.
  3. OSHA Inspection and Citation Assistance
    We will help manage the regulatory inspection process at your jobsite. Our safety professionals have years of experience managing these situations from opening to informal conference.
  4. OSHA Recordkeeping and Documentation
    We can help your company understand all the statutory recordkeeping requirements identified by OSHA.
  5. Construction Safety Inspections
    Construction safety inspections are the most effective means of identifying hazardous conditions at the worksite. Construction sites require constant monitoring and careful observations to stay ahead of safety issues. We help to identify potential OSHA violations, liability issues and risk exposures while assisting clients with mitigating hazards before they damage the reputation of the company and injure employees.

Why Construction Job Site Inspections are Important

Written safety programs, safety training, job hazard analysis, and other tools are used as part of a successful safety program. Construction safety inspections ensure that the safety planning and tools used have the desired effect in the real world. By identifying hazards, you’ll have the opportunity to fix these issues before injuries and accidents can occur.

The best defense against injury and loss is a comprehensive understanding of risks and deficiencies within your construction company and your projects.

We use the same methodologies and standards employed by OSHA and the insurance industry – or your own safety standards – as the basis for our review to ensure a safer construction job site.

We’re here to help

Need help making your construction job site safe? We offer the following services to help:

OSHA CONSULTING BUNDLE – Written directive/policy on requirements which can be either a corporate policy or a site-specific policy.

OSHA TRAINING  – We offer Open Enrollment Classes, Online Courses, and Private Company Sponsored Classes made available at your convenience.

If you have concerns about your workforce and coronavirus, please contact us today to learn about steps you can take to protect yourself, your family, and your employees.

 

covid onsite testing v2-min

MA Construction Reopening Plan – Why You Should Consider a Safety Professional

COVID-19 is having a major impact of the economy. Unemployment rates are at an all-time high. With the rate of infections seeming to be flattening across the country, states are beginning implement their reopening plans. While there is no question the economy needs to be restarted to help families and businesses improve their financial situation, the balancing act will be in keeping people safe while businesses begin to reopen.

The long-awaited plan developed by Gov. Charlie Baker provides a measured, four-phase approach that is intended to do just that.

MA Four Phase Plan Overview

  1. Phase One – Start
  2. Phase Two – Cautious
  3. Phase 3 – Vigilant
  4. Phase 4 – New Normal

Each phase will last a minimum of three weeks and could last longer before moving to the next phase. It is noted that work from home when available is still in place, along with masks, proper hygiene, and social distancing. The Governor’s Office has provided a detailed overview of the Four Phase Plan here.

Here is a summary of what will begin to open during Phase One:

May 18th:

  • Places of worship with guidelines and outdoor services are encouraged
  • Essential businesses, manufacturing, and construction
  • Hospitals and community health centers can start with high priority preventative care and treatment for high-risk patients
  • Public transit riders on the MBTA will be required to wear masks

On May 25, other business will begin to open with restrictions

  • Personal services – hair salons, barbershops, pet grooming (curbside drop off/pick up) – all by appointment only
  • Car washes – exterior washing only
  • Laboratories and life sciences facilities
  • Offices (not in Boston) but must be less than 25% maximum occupancy; work from home strongly encouraged
  • Retail for remote services and curbside pick up
  • Beaches, parks, drive-in theaters, athletic fields and courts, outdoor adventure activities, most fishing, hunting, and boating, along with outdoor gardens, zoos, reserves and public installations – all with guidelines
  • Day Care: Childcare operating at reduced capacity and on an emergency basis for children of workers with no safe alternative to group care

June 1 will include:

  • Offices in Boston

MA Construction Industry Reopening Plan and Guidelines

Construction sites in MA were permitted to reopen on May 18 with strict guidelines to follow. Broken into four sections, below are mandatory safety standards, recommended best practices and a link to a checklist for the construction sector.

Below are some pertinent highlights of the main areas of focus:

Enforcement and Oversight

  1. A site-specific COVID-19 Officer (who may also be the Health and Safety Officer) shall be designated for every site
  2. Develop and submit a site-specific risk analysis and enhanced COVID-19 safety plan for large, complicated construction projects a city or town
  3. For all projects undertaken, managed or funded by a state agency or authority there shall be joint enforcement responsibility between the project’s public Owner and the city or town where the project is located
  4. Cities and towns are authorized to enforce the COVID-19 Construction Safety Guidance
  5. Cities and towns may enforce the safety and distance protocols. Failure to comply may result in a pause of construction activities until a corrective action plan is prepared, submitted and approved by the city or town
  6. The city or town may require the Owner of a large, complicated private project to pay for an independent, third party inspector or inspection firm

Download the Safety Standards for Construction Checklist

Employee Health Protection – ZERO Tolerance

  1. Zero tolerance for sick workers reporting to work. If you are sick, stay home! If you feel sick, go

Home! If you see someone sick, send them home!

  • Self-certify prior to shift
    Prior to starting a shift, each employee will self-certify to their supervisor that they:
    • Have no signs of a fever or a measured temperature above 100.3 degrees or greater, a cough or trouble breathing within the past 24 hours
    • Have not had “close contact” with an individual diagnosed with COVID-19. “Close contact” means living in the same household as a person who has tested positive for COVID-19, caring for a person who has tested positive for COVID-19, being within 6 feet of a person who has tested positive for COVID-19 for about 15 minutes, or coming in direct contact with secretions (e.g., sharing utensils, being coughed on) from a person who has tested positive for COVID-19, while that person was symptomatic
    • Have not been asked to self-isolate or quarantine by their doctor or a local public health official

The Mandatory Safety Standards is a comprehensive checklist of numerous safety protocols that need to be enforced. Below is a sample of the protocols and include:

  • No handshaking
  • Wash hands often – wash stations are required
  • Lock down officed to all but authorized personnel
  • Each jobsite should develop cleaning and decontamination procedures that are posted and shared. These Procedures must cover all areas including trailers, gates, equipment, vehicles, etc. and shall be posted at all entry points to the sites, and throughout the project site
  • A “No Congregation” policy is in effect, individuals must implement social distancing by maintaining a minimum distance of 6-feet from other individuals
  • Avoid face to face meetings
  • Conduct all meetings via conference calls, if possible. Do not convene meetings of more than 10 people.
  • All individual work crew meetings / tailgate talks should be held outside and follow social distancing
  • Please keep all crews at a minimum of 6 feet apart
  • At each job briefing ask all employees if they are experiencing any symptoms, if so, send them home
  • Each jobsite should have laminated COVID-19 safety guidelines and handwashing instructions
  • All restroom facilities / porta-potties should be cleaned and handwashing stations must be provided with soap, hand sanitizer and paper towels
  • All surfaces should be regularly cleaned, including surfaces, door handles, laptops, etc.
  • All common areas and meeting areas are to be regularly cleaned and disinfected at least once a day but preferably twice a day
  • Be sure to use your own water bottle, and do not share

Download the Safety Standards for Construction Checklist

Worker Infection Protocol

There is a zero tolerance for sick workers reporting to work. Employees should be instructed that even those with mild symptoms of respiratory infection (cough, shortness of breath, sore throat) or fever should stay off work.

The Contractor shall work with the local board of health to identify any potential job site exposures. Upon learning of an infection, the contractor must immediately notify the designated COVID-19 safety officer, the site safety officer, and the owner. After a worker with COVID-19 related symptoms has been asked to leave the job site, the contractor shall take immediate steps to sanitize common areas and direct work places

View the entire, lengthy list of protocols here: MA Construction Mandatory Safety Standards

We Can Help You Reopen Safely

Our bundled COVID 19 /Coronavirus services system allows for quickly screening and detecting individuals with an elevated temperature. Utilizing a thermal thermometer in conjunction with our mobile app, we provide a solution that will alert employers and the workforce when a scanned person’s temperature exceeds a predetermined threshold, allowing for immediate intervention and protective measures.

We have furthered our efforts by creating a COVID 19 Training Webinars. We offer Open Enrollment Classes and Private Company Sponsored Classes made available at your convenience.

If you need assistance in your plan to reopen your business, please contact us today to learn more.

Passengers and commuter train

Construction Safety Services For 2020 Expansion Of The MA South Coast Railroad

The MBTA Fiscal and Management Control Board recently announced a nearly $159 million contract with Skanska DW White JV to build the Fall River Secondary was recently approved as the first major construction package of South Coast Rail.

According to the MBTA South Coast Rail project website, Taunton, New Bedford, and Fall River are the only major cities within 50 miles of Boston that do not currently have Commuter Rail access to Boston. Phase 1 will bring service to these communities by late 2023.

The project will be rolled out in phases:

Phase 1: Extend a secondary line west from the existing Middleborough/Lakeville Line, and create the New Bedford and Fall River lines

Full Build: Extend the Stoughton Line south to connect more communities to the New Bedford and Fall River lines

It was also noted since the groundbreaking in July 2019, South Coast Rail has spent close to $100 million on construction work, real estate acquisitions, vehicle procurement, and related design and contract management/administration.

Funding for the project will reach $8 billion and last 5 years, ending in 2023.

The project includes building two new commuter rail stations, parking lots, a bus drop off, a layover facility for train storage, 12 miles of track and multiple bridges.

Construction Safety Manager Job Skills Required

As with any industry, railroad workers have certain specific safety requirements that help eliminate hazards that can arise. Workers need to be specially trained to be aware of these hazards and know what the appropriate safety tools and protocols are to keep themselves and those around them safe.

Some of the safety requirements workers, supervisors, and safety managers need to know include:

  • – Understanding railroad signs, flags, and tags
  • – Special high-visibility vests and jackets
  • – Working Limits
  • – Track Speeds
  • – Direction of Train Traffic
  • – Where to Clear
  • – How to cross the tracks
  • – Hot Spot Areas
  • – Placement of Watchmen
  • – Rotation & Relief Policy
  • – Weather Conditions/Visibility
  • – Inspect Watchmen’s Equipment

Track Safety Training

As with any industry, railroad workers have certain specific safety training requirements that help eliminate hazards that can arise. Hazards that are common to railroads include poor visibility and weather conditions, struck-by hazards, caught-in-between, and hot spot areas.

Safety managers can keep workers informed on what the safety plan is, any changes to the safety plan; and key information such as where to clear, train schedules, work schedules, and visibility and weather reports.

Construction Safety Managers

Safety managers for this type of work must be familiar with the relevant track safety program as well as have extensive experience with construction safety.

While working on railway tracks, a specially trained safety managers on a railroad construction can help conduct safety briefings and safety audits and make recommendations for correction. Their knowledge of the specific hazards inherent to railways can assist in the reduction of injuries and deaths.

Construction Safety Services

United Alliance’s Construction Safety Services Division provides high quality, professional and cost-effective health and safety services to construction clients, adding value to our client’s organization and protecting their greatest assets – their employees.

We provide OSHA and workplace environmental health and safety consulting and training for the construction industry. Our safety consulting services free clients from the challenge of finding and hiring safety consultants for special projects. United Alliance Services provides the site safety representative and administers all compensation, benefits and taxes, without the client having the additional overhead.

We offer the following services:

  1. Safety Programs and Site-Specific Plans
  2. OSHA Inspection and Citation Assistance
  3. OSHA Recordkeeping and Documentation
  4. Construction Safety Inspections

We also provide a robust Online Training Program that can be tailored to any construction safety training need.

Need help with your Construction Site Safety Plan? Contact us today for a free evaluation and risk assessment.

fall protection course-min

EM385 FP Training Classes – March 16, 17, 18 – Don’t Miss Out!

It’s a training requirement that has hit many construction supervisors or project manager’s sites; yet, it still seems to be one of those training requirements that is not widely offered, even here in the Northeast.

The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has a 900-page manual that outlines the safety regulations for their job-sites, with many of the requirements being a bit stricter than OSHA regulations.

Every contractor and subcontractor on a UASCE-overseen job-site must have at least one person who is trained and competent on the specifics buried within those 900 pages of their Engineer Manual (EM) 385-1-1. There’s no getting out of it.

PM’s Need for EM 385 Training

Given the number of daily phone calls we receive from PMs who need the training ASAP in order to return to work, the UASCE has become more stringent on ensuring this training is completed. They are also doling out some hefty fines as well as issuing stop orders until the mandates are met – especially if you don’t have designated safety personnel on-site.

Thankfully, we have several highly competent and trained construction professionals who have poured over the complete 900 pages and have designed a training program that ensures compliance.

Our EM 385 Compliance training, often referred to as 24 Hour Competent Person Fall Protection, is one of our most sought out training – often after being kicked off a job site. Those same trainers are able to also assist in meeting the requirements of having a Site Safety and Health Officer (SSHO) and Quality Control Manager, Quality Assurances Manager (QA/QC) on-site quickly.

Federal Bid Requirement

If you’re planning on bidding on a federal contract that takes place in Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, and New Jersey or on any of the bases listed below, be sure to reach out to us to secure your training.

This will no doubt save your company money, fines, and lost work time and make you the star employee of the week.

We can promise you that somewhere, tucked away in the fine print, the USACE requires you to have at least one person training in EM 385, 24 Hour Competent Person Fall Protection on your site at ALL times. There aren’t any loopholes or fast-talking yourself out of the requirement.

It also doesn’t exempt you from following OSHA regulations and our course clearly outlines the differences between the two. Because of this, we strongly recommend that all persons in our EM 385 training also have completed their OSHA 10 Hour Construction training. For an added peace of mind, we strongly recommend you train multiple employees to ensure that you always have someone available in case of injury, illness, or time-off requests.

We’ve clocked thousands of hours of training on this topic at various bases and our experts can help your team members understand the complexities of the UASCE requirements, ensure their fall arrest systems are safe and in compliance, and know their responsibilities on a job site.

Projects on Bases

If you have any upcoming projects in VT, NH, MA, RI, CT, NY or NJ at any of these bases*, be sure to call us today to secure your training dates or SSHO and/or QA/QC needs:

Massachusetts

Barnes Air National Guard Base, Westfield, MA
Otis Air National Guard Base, Buzzards Bay, MA
Hanscom Airforce Base, Bedford, MA
Westover Air Reserve Base, Chicopee, MA
Fort Devens, Devens, MA
AIRSTA Cape Cod, Buzzards Bay, MA
AIRSTA Salem, Salem, MA
Aviation Station Ten Pound Island, Gloucester, MA

Rhode Island

Quonset Point Air National Guard Station, North Kingstown, RI
NS Newport, Newport RI

Connecticut

Marine Safety Center Marine Base in Groton, CT
Research And Development Center Coast Guard Groton, CT
Coast Guard Academy in New London, CT
Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, CT

New York

Fort Drum Army Base in Jefferson, NY
Fort Hamilton Army Base in Brooklyn, NY
US Military Academy Army Base in West Point, NY
Watervliet Arsenal Army Base in Watervliet, NY

New Jersey

McGuire Air Force Base in New Hanover, NJ
Fort Dix Army Base in Burlington, NJ
Fort Monmouth Army Base in Monmouth, NJ
Picatinny Arsenal Army Base in Morris County, NJ
Loran Support Unit Coast Guard Base in Wildwood, NJ
Training Center Cape May Coast Guard Cape May, NJ
NWS Earle Navy Base in Colts Neck, NJ
NAES Lakehurst Navy Base in Lakehurst, NJ

*This is not a complete list of military bases

Sign up for an EM385 24 Hour Fall Protection Training Class here.

To sign up for the next public class offering at United Alliance Services Corporation, visit our online calendar.

For more information, call 877-399-1698

Worker using fall protection gear as a safety precaution he learned in em 385 training

UASC filling in EM385 FP Training lack in Northeast

It’s a training requirement that has hit many construction supervisor or project manager’s site; yet, it still seems to be one of those trainings that is not widely offered, even here in the Northeast. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has a 900-page manual that outlines the safety regulations for their job-sites, with many of the requirements being a bit stricter than OSHA regulations. Every contractor and subcontractor on a UASCE-overseen job-site must have at least one person who is trained and competent on the specifics buried within those 900 pages of their Engineer Manual (EM) 385-1-1. There’s no getting out of it.

PM’s Need for EM 385 Training

Given the amount of daily phone calls we receive from PMs who need the training ASAP in order to return to work, the UASCE has become more stringent on ensuring this training is completed. They are also doling out some hefty fines as well as issuing stop orders until the mandates are met – especially if you don’t have designated safety personnel on-site. Thankfully, we have several highly competent and trained construction professionals who have poured over the complete 900 pages and have designed a training program that ensures compliance. Our EM 385 Compliance training, often referred to as 24 Hour Competent Person Fall Protection, is one of our most sought out trainings – often after being kicked off a job site. Those same trainers are able to also assist on meeting the requirements of having a Site Safety and Health Officer (SSHO) and Quality Control Manager, Quality Assurances Manager (QA/QC) on-site quickly.

Federal Bid Requirement

If you’re planning on bidding on a federal contract that takes place in Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York and New Jersey or on any of the bases listed below, be sure to reach out to us to secure your training. This will no doubt save your company money, fines, and lost work-time and make you the star employee of the week. We can promise you that somewhere, tucked away in the fine print, the USACE requires you to have at least one person training in EM 385, 24 Hour Competent Person Fall Protection on your site at ALL times. There aren’t any loopholes or fast-talking yourself out of the requirement. It also doesn’t exempt you from following OSHA regulations and our course clearly outlines the differences between the two. Because of this, we strongly recommend that all persons in our EM 385 training also have completed their OSHA 10 Hour Construction training. For an added peace of mind, we strongly recommend you train multiple employees to ensure that you always have someone available in case of injury, illness, or time off requests.

We’ve clocked thousands of hours of training on this topic at various bases and our experts can help your team members understand the complexities of the UASCE requirements, ensure their fall arrest systems are safe and in compliance, and know their responsibilities on a job site.

Projects on Bases

If you have any upcoming projects in VT, NH, MA, RI, CT, NY or NJ at any of these bases*, be sure to call us today to secure your training dates or SSHO and/or QA/QC needs:

Massachusetts

Barnes Air National Guard Base, Westfield, MA
Otis Air National Guard Base, Buzzards Bay, MA
Hanscom Airforce Base, Bedford, MA
Westover Air Reserve Base, Chicopee, MA
Fort Devens, Devens, MA
AIRSTA Cape Cod, Buzzards Bay, MA
AIRSTA Salem, Salem, MA
Aviation Station Ten Pound Island, Gloucester, MA

Rhode Island

Quonset Point Air National Guard Station, North Kingstown, RI
NS Newport, Newport RI

Connecticut

Marine Safety Center Marine Base in Groton, CT
Research And Development Center Coast Guard Groton, CT
Coast Guard Academy in New London, CT
Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, CT

New York

Fort Drum Army Base in Jefferson, NY
Fort Hamilton Army Base in Brooklyn, NY
US Military Academy Army Base in West Point, NY
Watervilet Arsenal Army Base in Watervilet, NY

New Jersey

McGuire Air Force Base in New Hanover, NJ
Fort Dix Army Base in Burlington, NJ
Fort Monmouth Army Base in Monmouth, NJ
Picatinny Arsenal Army Base in Morris County, NJ
Loran Support Unit Coast Guard Base in Wildwood, NJ
Training Center Cape May Coast Guard Cape May, NJ
NWS Earle Navy Base in Colts Neck, NJ
NAES Lakehurst Navy Base in Lakehurst, NJ

*This is not a complete list of military bases

To sign up for an EM385 24 Hour Fall Protection Training Class, visit our website. To sign up for the next public class offering at United Alliance Services Corporation, visit our online calendar. For more information, call 774-302-4305.

Man in a hardhat standing inside a warehouse

Assisting Mass Municipal Agencies in Preparing for the 2019 OSHA Requirements

Updated OSHA Compliance with MGL has begun!

Here is a simple one-pager on how United Alliance Services can help get you into compliance!

OSHA Safety Training for Municipalities & Schools

Beginning February 2019, public employees are required to provide OSHA safety training and maintain OSHA compliance with job sites and safety training.

OSHA – UASC Training for MUNICIPALITIES:

  • Address the OSHA training requirements specific to each department
  • Training standards help municipalities perform jobs safely reducing worker comp, medical leave times, and injuries on the job.
  • Choose up to six electives that best suits your team members.
  • We maintain copies of all training’s, so if your system is compromised, we have a backup.
  • We’ll notify you when refreshers need to be renewed, so it’s one less thing to fall through the cracks.
  • We have developed the training programs allowing you to focus on your area of expertise

Click here for OSHA Safety Training for Municipalities!

OSHA – UASC Training for SCHOOLS:

  • Experienced OSHA safety regulations instructors
  • Help school employees perform their jobs safely by outlining first-hand, real-life scenarios
  • You choose the sessions that best suit your team members as you know them best
  • We maintain backup copies of all training documentation
  • Notifications when refreshers need to be renewed
  • We have developed the training programs, which is our area of expertise, to allow you to focus on your area of expertise – running an efficient school system.

Click here for OSHA Safety Training for MA Schools!

Record Keeping

Prior to the new law, the public sector was exempt from maintaining an OSHA 300 log. The MA Department of Labor Standards (DLS) now states that you only need to provide your OSHA 300 log when an inspector or the Bureau of Labor Statistics requests to see it.

The best practice is to maintain an OSHA 300 log.

OSHA 300 Log for MA Public Sector

An OSHA 300 log is used by private sector employers with more than 10 employees to maintain a record of injuries and illnesses that took place and are referred to as a “recordable”.

All of the recordables are documented, but each record also needs a form 301 completed, which details the injury/illness.

A recordable includes any work-related illness and/or injury that results in:

• Fatality
• loss of consciousness, missed work, restricted work, transfer to a lower-risk job
• medical treatment beyond first aid
• diagnosis of a work-related cancer, chronic irreversible disease, fractured or cracked bones/teeth, and punctured eardrums
• any drugs being prescribed or taken at prescription strength

Needle-sticks and sharps injuries, medical removal, hearing loss, and tuberculosis have special recording criteria.

Man in a hardhat standing inside a warehouse

Adjusted OSHA Penalties for 2019

OSHA has increased the maximum fines

The maximum fines are now $132,598 per violation for willful or repeated violations for a company, and $13,260 per violation for serious, Other-than-Serious, and Posting violations.

Companies can have multiple violations from one OSHA inspection

For repeated violations, it doesn’t matter that the violation happened at another location of a company.  It is a repeated violation when one location has been issued the violation and a different branch has the same violation.

Failure to abate Violation

The penalty is increased to $13,260 per day beyond the abatement date.  For this reason, it is important to correct OSHA violations and document it back to them with the paperwork that they provide. Then be sure that the corrections are maintained.
For help monitoring job sites, please call United Alliance Services because we conduct documented safety audits of company workplaces and job sites as part of stand-alone auditing services and our annual packages.
For more info on this click here!
Man in a hardhat standing inside a warehouse

Assisting Mass Municipal Agencies in Preparing for the 2019 OSHA Requirements

Updated OSHA Compliance with MGL has begun!

Here is a simple one-pager on how United Alliance Services can help get you into compliance!

OSHA Safety Training for Municipalities & Schools

Beginning February 2019, public employees are required to provide OSHA safety training and maintain OSHA compliance with job sites and safety training.

OSHA – UASC Training for MUNICIPALITIES:

  • Address the OSHA training requirements specific to each department
  • Training standards help municipalities perform jobs safely reducing worker comp, medical leave times, and injuries on the job.
  • Choose up to six electives that best suits your team members.
  • We maintain copies of all training’s, so if your system is compromised, we have a backup.
  • We’ll notify you when refreshers need to be renewed, so it’s one less thing to fall through the cracks.
  • We have developed the training programs allowing you to focus on your area of expertise

Click here for OSHA Safety Training for Municipalities!

OSHA – UASC Training for SCHOOLS:

  • Experienced OSHA safety regulations instructors
  • Help school employees perform their jobs safely by outlining first-hand, real-life scenarios
  • You choose the sessions that best suit your team members as you know them best
  • We maintain backup copies of all training documentation
  • Notifications when refreshers need to be renewed
  • We have developed the training programs, which is our area of expertise, to allow you to focus on your area of expertise – running an efficient school system.

Click here for OSHA Safety Training for MA Schools!

Record Keeping

Prior to the new law, the public sector was exempt from maintaining an OSHA 300 log. The MA Department of Labor Standards (DLS) now states that you only need to provide your OSHA 300 log when an inspector or the Bureau of Labor Statistics requests to see it.

The best practice is to maintain an OSHA 300 log.

OSHA 300 Log for MA Public Sector

An OSHA 300 log is used by private sector employers with more than 10 employees to maintain a record of injuries and illnesses that took place and are referred to as a “recordable”.

All of the recordables are documented, but each record also needs a form 301 completed, which details the injury/illness.

A recordable includes any work-related illness and/or injury that results in:

• Fatality
• loss of consciousness, missed work, restricted work, transfer to a lower-risk job
• medical treatment beyond first aid
• diagnosis of a work-related cancer, chronic irreversible disease, fractured or cracked bones/teeth, and punctured eardrums
• any drugs being prescribed or taken at prescription strength

Needle-sticks and sharps injuries, medical removal, hearing loss, and tuberculosis have special recording criteria.

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OSHA Log for MA Public Sector

In continuance of our blog series..

Record Keeping

Prior to the new law, the public sector was exempt from maintaining an OSHA 300 log. The MA Department of Labor Standards (DLS) now states that you only need to provide your OSHA 300 log when an inspector or the Bureau of Labor Statistics requests to see it.

The best practice is to maintain an OSHA 300 log.

OSHA 300 Log for MA Public Sector

An OSHA 300 log is used by private sector employers with more than 10 employees to maintain a record of injuries and illnesses that took place and are referred to as a “recordable”.

All of the recordables are documented, but each record also needs a form 301 completed, which details the injury/illness.

A recordable includes any work-related illness and/or injury that results in:

• Fatality
• loss of consciousness, missed work, restricted work, transfer to a lower-risk job
• medical treatment beyond first aid
• diagnosis of a work-related cancer, chronic irreversible disease, fractured or cracked bones/teeth, and punctured eardrums
• any drugs being prescribed or taken at prescription strength

Needlesticks and sharps injuries, medical removal, hearing loss, and tuberculosis have special recording criteria.

 

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Massachusetts DLS affecting private sectors

As stated in the first blog of the series, Governor Baker amended MGL Chapter 149, section 6 1/2 to include reference to OSHA regulations, updating the law written before OSHA’s inception. This regulation now applies to the public sector.

The law has been updated to contain phrases of OSHA compliance since it was written prior to OSHA inception. OSHA will continue to oversee federal and private entities.

The Mass DLS will oversee the Massachusetts Public Sector while following the general duty clause and practices outlined by OSHA. Neither supersede each other.

Private Companies

There will not be much difference in your day-to-day operations if you’re following OSHA regulations. However, if you’re working on a public job-site be prepared for the Massachusetts Department of Labor Standards (DLS) to pay a visit and look for infractions. Normally, the DLS schedules their visits, unless there is an “imminent” hazard. They can issue corrective action plans that are fine-able if not completed within the given time frame for public sector employers. OSHA will still be the governing agency for private sector employers.

Publicly bid construction projects over $10,000 require the employees on site to have completed their OSHA Outreach 10 Hour Construction training.

We Can Help

United Alliance Services can provide the training right on the job-site, in a private classroom, or in our corporate office. Please call 877-399-1698 if you need to conduct this training to be able to bid on a project.